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Electropermanent magnetic connectors and actuators : devices and their application in programmable matter

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dc.contributor.advisor Daniela L. Rus and Neil A. Gershenfeld. en_US
dc.contributor.author Knaian, Ara N. (Ara Nerses), 1977- en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-12-06T17:30:14Z
dc.date.available 2010-12-06T17:30:14Z
dc.date.copyright 2010 en_US
dc.date.issued 2010 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/60151
dc.description Thesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2010. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 199-206). en_US
dc.description.abstract Programmable matter is a digital material having computation, sensing, and actuation capabilities as continuous properties active over its whole extent. To make programmable matter economical to fabricate, we want to use electromagnetic direct drive, rather than clockwork, to actuate the particles. Previous attempts to fabricate small scale (below one centimeter) robotic systems with electromagnetic direct-drive have typically run into problems with insufficient force or torque, excessive power consumption and heat generation (for magnetic-drive systems), or high-voltage requirements, humidity sensitivity, and air breakdown. (for electrostatic-drive systems) The electropermanent magnet is a solid-state device whose external magnetic flux can be stably switched on and off by a discrete electrical pulse. Electropermanent magnets can provide low-power connection and actuation for programmable matter and other small-scale robotic systems. The first chapter covers the electropermanent magnet, its physics, scaling, fabrication, and our experimental device performance data. The second introduces the idea of electropermanent actuators, covers their fundamental limits and scaling, and shows prototype devices and performance measurements. The third chapter describes the smart pebbles system, which consists of 12-mm cubes that can form shapes by stochastic self-assembly and self-disassembly. The fourth chapter describes the millibot, a continuous chain of programmable matter which forms shapes by folding. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Ara Nerses Knaian. en_US
dc.format.extent 208 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. en_US
dc.title Electropermanent magnetic connectors and actuators : devices and their application in programmable matter en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree Ph.D. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 681600109 en_US


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