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Addressing the risks of diagnostic radiology : what should be done about the increasing use of computed tomography in the United States

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dc.contributor.advisor Jacquelyn C. Yanch. en_US
dc.contributor.author Eastwick, Gary (Gary A.) en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-us--- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-05-09T15:22:32Z
dc.date.available 2011-05-09T15:22:32Z
dc.date.copyright 2010 en_US
dc.date.issued 2010 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/62703
dc.description Thesis (S.B.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering, 2010. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 29-30). en_US
dc.description.abstract Computed tomography (CT) is a prominent procedure in the US with larger radiation doses than traditional radiology. CT is a powerful tool in the diagnosis of a wide variety of conditions and its use has grown quickly because of its power. CT contributes a significant portion of annual per capita dose in the US. The risk of this additional dose is poorly understood. The risks of low doses of radiation are estimated through models, primarily the linear no-threshold (LNT) model. Epidemiological evidence from atomic bomb survivors provides some understanding of the risk of low doses of radiation, but not on the order of doses from typical CT procedures. This paper explores the evidence of the risk of low doses of radiation and discusses some of the models proposed. Recommendations for improving these models are made including experimental and epidemiological studies. Recommendations for reducing radiation exposure through the intelligent use of CT are also presented including: using CT only when it produces a clear clinical benefit, reducing dose per scan, and tracking total patient dose. Finally, a case is made that a thorough understanding of the risk versus dose relationship at doses relevant to CT is not necessary to use CT appropriately. The culture of evidence-based medicine will achieve this result without conscious efforts to reduce patient radiation exposure. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Gary Eastwick. en_US
dc.format.extent 30 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Nuclear Science and Engineering. en_US
dc.title Addressing the risks of diagnostic radiology : what should be done about the increasing use of computed tomography in the United States en_US
dc.title.alternative What should be done about the increasing use of computed tomography in the United States en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.B. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 714604698 en_US


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