Advanced Search
DSpace@MIT

Waveless picking : managing the system and making the case for adoption and change

Research and Teaching Output of the MIT Community

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Jérémie Gallien and David Simchi-Levi. en_US
dc.contributor.author Bishop, G. Todd (Gordon Todd) en_US
dc.contributor.other Leaders for Global Operations Program. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-05-23T18:14:58Z
dc.date.available 2011-05-23T18:14:58Z
dc.date.copyright 2010 en_US
dc.date.issued 2010 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/63083
dc.description Thesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Engineering Systems Division; and, (M.B.A.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sloan School of Management; in conjunction with the Leaders for Global Operations Program at MIT, 2010. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 63-66). en_US
dc.description.abstract Wave-based picking systems have been used as the standard for warehouse order fulfillment for many years. Waveless picking has emerged in recent years as an alternative pick scheduling system, with proponents touting the productivity and throughput gains within such a system. This paper analyzes in more depth the differences between these two types of systems, and offers insight into the comparative advantages and disadvantages of each. While a select few pieces of literature perform some analyses of wave vs. waveless picking, this paper uses a case-study of a waveless picking system in an Amazon.com fulfillment center as a model for how to manage a waveless system once it has been adopted. Optimization methods for decreasing chute-dwell time and increasing throughput by utilizing tote prioritization are also performed using discrete-simulation modeling. The analysis concludes that managing waveless picking warehouse flow by controlling the allowable quantity of partially picked orders to match downstream chute capacity can lead to reduced control over cycle times and customer experience. Suggestions are also made on possible future research for how to optimally implement a cycle-time controlled system. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by G. Todd Bishop. en_US
dc.format.extent 70 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Engineering Systems Division. en_US
dc.subject Sloan School of Management. en_US
dc.subject Leaders for Global Operations Program. en_US
dc.title Waveless picking : managing the system and making the case for adoption and change en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree M.B.A. en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division. en_US
dc.contributor.department Sloan School of Management. en_US
dc.contributor.department Leaders for Global Operations Program. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 725946320 en_US


Files in this item

Name Size Format Description
725946320.pdf 10.91Mb PDF Preview, non-printable (open to all)
725946320-MIT.pdf 10.91Mb PDF Full printable version (MIT only)

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

MIT-Mirage