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Naval ship propulsion and electric power systems selection for optimal fuel consumption

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dc.contributor.advisor Mark S. Welsh. en_US
dc.contributor.author Sarris, Emmanouil en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-01-13T18:44:42Z
dc.date.available 2012-01-13T18:44:42Z
dc.date.copyright 2011 en_US
dc.date.issued 2011 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/68573
dc.description Thesis (Nav. E.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; and, (S.M. in Engineering and Management)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Engineering Systems Division, System Design and Management Program, 2011. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. [100]-102). en_US
dc.description.abstract Although propulsion and electric power systems selection is an important part of naval ship design, respective decisions often have to be made without detailed ship knowledge (resistance, propulsors, etc.). Propulsion and electric power systems have always had to satisfy speed and ship-service power requirements. Nowadays, increasing fuel costs are moving such decisions towards more fuel-efficient solutions. Unlike commercial ships, naval ships operate in a variety of speeds and electric loads, making fuel consumption optimization challenging. This thesis develops a flexible decision support tool in Matlab® environment, which identifies the propulsion and ship-service power generation systems configuration that minimizes fuel consumption for any ship based on its operating profile. Mechanical-driven propulsion systems with or without propulsion derived ship-service power generation, separate ship-service systems and integrated power systems are analyzed. Modeling includes hull resistance using the Holtrop-Mennen method requiring only basic hull geometry information, propeller efficiencies using the Wageningen B series and transmission and prime movers fuel efficiencies. Propulsion and ship-service power generation systems configuration is optimized using the genetic algorithm. US Navy's Advanced Surface Ship Evaluation Tool (ASSET) model for the DDG-51 Flight I destroyer was used for modeling validation. Optimal fuel consumption results are compared against the existing configuration for the DDG-51 Flight I destroyer using a representative operating profile. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Emmanouil Sarris. en_US
dc.format.extent 228 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.relation.requires CDROM contains supplemental material (data and Excel files). en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Mechanical Engineering. en_US
dc.subject Engineering Systems Division. en_US
dc.title Naval ship propulsion and electric power systems selection for optimal fuel consumption en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M.in Engineering and Management en_US
dc.description.degree Nav.E. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division. en_US
dc.contributor.department System Design and Management Program. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 767605371 en_US


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