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The influences of the just-in-time social cloud on real world decisions

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dc.contributor.advisor Andrew B. Lippman. en_US
dc.contributor.author Lee, Kwan Hong, 1977- en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-05-15T21:14:12Z
dc.date.available 2012-05-15T21:14:12Z
dc.date.copyright 2012 en_US
dc.date.issued 2012 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/70809
dc.description Thesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Planning, Program in Media Arts and Sciences, 2012. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 209-224). en_US
dc.description.abstract People have intertemporal biases towards choices that result in immediate gratification versus delayed rewards. The social context can accentuate or downplay preferences towards virtues or vices when making choices in the moment. Especially in our modern world where social networks are virtually accessible at anytime, from anywhere, how our day-today decisions are affected by the "always-on" connection to our social networks via mobile devices is an open question. By understanding the dimensions of these social forces, we can utilize the just-in-time social cloud to nudge people towards decisions that have long term benefits for health and finances, while counterbalancing the forces of the marketers that trigger our impulses towards immediate temptations that we may regret later. This work presents an empirical inquiry into the effect of just-in-time social influences in human decision-making. In order to understand these effects and discover their parameters, I design and deploy real-world experiments with the just-in-time social cloud using mobile phones as platforms for just-in-time social influence. The Open Transaction Network forms the basis of generating just-in-time social networks based on the transactions shared by people in the context of commerce. The Open Transaction Network is extended to several systems to conduct real-world experiments involving real choices. By augmenting mobile commerce applications with just-in-time social networks, I design a mobile commerce environment that can socially influence our just-in-time choices. The Open Credit Card Application Framework augments existing methods of payment by using transactions as triggers to enable mobile applications that facilitate just-in-time decisions or reflections. Friends within communities show significant similarity in their hourly transaction behaviors. Varying manifestations of the just-in-time social cloud (individual friends, groups of friends and popularity information) can be used to nudge people's choices in the dimensions of taste, price and time as they decide. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Kwan Hong Lee. en_US
dc.format.extent 224 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences. en_US
dc.title The influences of the just-in-time social cloud on real world decisions en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree Ph.D. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 792945426 en_US


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