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Demand forecast for short life cycle products : Zara case study

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dc.contributor.advisor Jeremie Gallien, Stephen C. Graves and David Simchi-Levi. en_US
dc.contributor.author Bonnefoi, Tatiana (Bonnefoi Monroy) en_US
dc.contributor.other Leaders for Global Operations Program. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-10-26T18:10:10Z
dc.date.available 2012-10-26T18:10:10Z
dc.date.copyright 2012 en_US
dc.date.issued 2010 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/74454
dc.description Thesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; and, (M.B.A.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sloan School of Management; in conjunction with the Leaders for Global Operations Program at MIT, 2010. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 79-80). en_US
dc.description.abstract The problem of optimally purchasing new products is common to many companies and industries. This thesis describes how this challenge was addressed at Zara, a leading retailer in the "fast fashion" industry. This thesis discusses the development of a methodology to optimize the purchasing process for seasonal, short life-cycle articles. The methodology includes a process to develop a point forecast of demand of new articles, the top-down forecast at the color and size level and an optimization module to produce recommendations to define the optimal quantity to purchase and the optimal origin to source from. This thesis is the first phase of a two phases purchasing optimization process. The focus of this thesis is: a) the outline of an enhanced purchasing methodology b) the development of the most important input in the system: a point forecast of demand at the article, color, and size level, and c) the development of an IT prototype to automatically manage the purchasing methodology. The second phase of the purchasing optimization process focuses on the optimization module. The optimization module is beyond the reach of this thesis. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Tatiana Bonnefoi. en_US
dc.format.extent 82 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Mechanical Engineering. en_US
dc.subject Sloan School of Management. en_US
dc.subject Leaders for Global Operations Program. en_US
dc.title Demand forecast for short life cycle products : Zara case study en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree M.B.A. en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering. en_US
dc.contributor.department Sloan School of Management. en_US
dc.contributor.department Leaders for Global Operations Program. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 813318635 en_US


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