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Remote nondestructive evaluation of composite-steel interface by acoustic laser vibrometry

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dc.contributor.advisor Oral Büyüköztürk. en_US
dc.contributor.author Emge, Timothy James, II en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-11-19T19:16:54Z
dc.date.available 2012-11-19T19:16:54Z
dc.date.copyright 2012 en_US
dc.date.issued 2012 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/74902
dc.description Thesis (Nav. E. )--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; and, (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2012. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 70-73). en_US
dc.description.abstract Composite materials are increasingly being used in both civil and ship structures. In particular, fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are being utilized. FRP materials are most often employed to reinforce aging or damaged portions of civil structures. On naval vessels, FRP materials are incorporated to reduce weight, particularly up high, and to reduce radar cross section, thereby increasing stealth capability. In both cases of FRP use, it is usually in conjunction with some other material, oftentimes steel. It is beneficial when using FRP and steel to adhesively bond them together. When these materials are joined adhesively, the most common failure mode is debonding or delamination at the interface of the adhesive with the steel and composite materials. These defects are often difficult to discern without the aid of some form of nondestructive testing (NDT). Acoustic laser vibrometry is a relatively new method of NDT that shows a lot of promise in analysis of this interface. In this approach, an airborne acoustic wave is utilized to excite the location of the damage underneath the FRP sheets/plates and the target vibration is measured using a laser vibrometer. To study the acoustic laser method, a defect specimen was created from a plate of AL6XN stainless steel and a plate of glass FRP adhesively bonded on their faces with a purposely placed elliptical debonding defect. A number of parameters of the acoustic laser vibrometry system were varied and trends were found. Additionally, grid data was collected from the defect specimen and a defect mapping was created. Theoretical and finite element models were produced and compared to measured results. The close correlation of the results from these three methods validated them all. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Timothy James Emge, II. en_US
dc.format.extent 73 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Mechanical Engineering. en_US
dc.subject Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.title Remote nondestructive evaluation of composite-steel interface by acoustic laser vibrometry en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.description.degree Nav.E. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 815416385 en_US


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