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Diffusion MRI of complex tissue structure

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dc.contributor.advisor Van Jay Wedeen and John Belliveau. en_US
dc.contributor.author Tuch, David Solomon, 1973- en_US
dc.contributor.other Harvard University--MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2005-08-23T19:22:31Z
dc.date.available 2005-08-23T19:22:31Z
dc.date.copyright 2002 en_US
dc.date.issued 2002 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/8348
dc.description Thesis (Ph. D.)--Harvard--Massachusetts Institute of Technology Division of Health Sciences and Technology, 2002. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description.abstract Magnetic resonance diffusion imaging provides an exquisitely sensitive probe of tissue microstructure. Owing to the microscopic length scale of diffusion in biological tissues, diffusion imaging can reveal histological architecture irresolvable by conventional magnetic resonance imaging methods. However, diffusion imaging methods to date have chiefly been based on analytical models of the underlying diffusion process. For example, diffusion tensor imaging assumes homogeneous Gaussian diffusion within each voxel, an assumption which is clearly invalid for the vast majority of the brain at presently achievable voxel resolutions. In this thesis I developed a diffusion imaging method capable of measuring the microscopic diffusion function within each voxel. In contrast to previous approaches to diffusion imaging, the method presented here does not require any assumptions on the underlying diffusion function. The model-independent approach can resolve complex intravoxel tissue structure including fiber crossing and fiber divergence within a single voxel. The method is capable of resolving not only deep white matter intersections, but also composite tissue structure at the cortical margin, and fiber-specific degeneration in neurodegenerative pathology. In sum, the approach can reveal complex intravoxel tissue structure previously thought to be beyond the scope of diffusion imaging methodology. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by David Solomon Tuch. en_US
dc.format.extent 220 p. en_US
dc.format.extent 19360547 bytes
dc.format.extent 19360306 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subject Harvard University--MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology. en_US
dc.title Diffusion MRI of complex tissue structure en_US
dc.title.alternative Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging of complex tissue structure en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree Ph.D. en_US
dc.contributor.department Harvard University--MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 50543782 en_US


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