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dc.contributor.advisorEric von Hippel.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHill, Benjamin Mako, 1980-en_US
dc.contributor.otherSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-25T15:19:49Z
dc.date.available2014-04-25T15:19:49Z
dc.date.copyright2013en_US
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/86240
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sloan School of Management, 2013.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 93-102).en_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough some examples of Internet-based collaborative "peer production" -- like Wikipedia and Linux -- build large volunteer communities and high-quality information goods, the vast majority of attempts at peer production never even attract a second contributor. This dissertation is composed of three essays that describe and test theories on the sources and effects of volunteer mobilization in peer production. The first essay is a qualitative analysis of seven attempts to create English-language online collaborative encyclopedia projects started before January 2001, when Wikipedia was launched. Analyzing data from interviews of these Wikipedia-like projects' initiators, along with extensive archival data, I offer a set of three propositions for why Wikipedia, similar to previous efforts and a relatively late entrant, attracted a community of hundreds of thousands while the other projects did not. In the second essay, I use data from the Scratch online community -- a large website where young people openly share and remix animations and games -- to present evidence of a trade-off between "generativity" (i.e., qualities of work products likely to attract follow-on contributors) and the originality of the derivative work products that follow. In the third essay, I consider the relationship between volunteer mobilization and governance in peer production organizations. Although large successful peer production projects have inspired scholars and social movements, I use longitudinal data of internal processes drawn from a population of wikis to show that, like other democratic organizations, peer production projects exhibit governance consistent with Robert Michels' "Iron Law of Oligarchy."en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Benjamin Mako Hill.en_US
dc.format.extent111 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.titleEssays on volunteer mobilization in peer productionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc874134737en_US


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