Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMartin L. Culpepper.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDiBiasio, Christopher M. (Christopher Michael)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-05-15T20:35:31Z
dc.date.available2006-05-15T20:35:31Z
dc.date.copyright2005en_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/32864
dc.descriptionThesis (S.B.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, 2005.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 55).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this research is to generate the design knowledge required to produce a small-scale, low-cost precision positioning device. Accurate motion manipulation on the nanometer level is one of the main challenges facing precision engineers today. With more developed nations' economies being driven in part by the growing telecommunications, photonics, and integrated circuit industries, the need for inexpensive and accurate solutions for precision motion manipulation is clear. Unfortunately, current technology requires costly sensors and feedback control to achieve the necessary accuracy to complete even the simplest precision manipulation tasks. This feedback control can represent up to 50% of the total packaging cost of these systems. These systems could be much more affordable if the feedback and controls could be eliminated from devices such as Cartesian nanopositioners. This thesis presents a novel MEMS Cartesian nanopositioner referred to as DNAT) that is digitally actuated and requires no sensors or feedback (control, yet still provides the accuracy and resolution offered by today's state of the art systems. The modeling, design, and fabrication of this device is covered within this thesis. A prototype was designed and fabricated for use as a proof-of-concept, and a verification of the modeling techniques developed as a result of this research. The result is a conceptual model and design knowledge that may change the way many important fine motion tasks are carried out.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Christopher M. DiBiasio.en_US
dc.format.extent63 pen_US
dc.format.extent2920471 bytes
dc.format.extent2922361 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleDesign of a digitally actuated, micro-scale Cartesian nanopositioneren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc62587692en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record