Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorC. Forbes Dewey.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZedler, Matthew R. (Matthew Robert)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-03-27T18:24:30Z
dc.date.available2008-03-27T18:24:30Z
dc.date.copyright2007en_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/40929
dc.descriptionThesis (S.B.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, 2007.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 33).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this project was to develop a computer simulation of the proposed 2.672 electric vehicle experiment (EVE) to estimate the magnitudes of the powers required in different components of the drive train, piecewise component and system efficiencies, and the information that would need to be collected to construct different component power models. The EVE model had to incorporate both acceleration and deceleration of the vehicle, using regenerative braking as needed. The resulting model can be used to evaluate the safety and feasibility of the EVE and determine sizes of relevant testing equipment required to implement the EVE. The model showed that the EVE could work safely and be modeled with a reasonable amount of effort by students in 2.672. The relatively low power flows (under 4kW) allow safe operation while the students are learning about the efficiencies of the individual components. The most inefficient component for the low speeds expected in the EVE was the motor/generator unit, though the efficiency increased as the torque increased. The gearbox and controller efficiencies were modeled as constants in the simplified model since the manufacturer's literature only quoted one value for the gearbox and since there was a lack of detailed information about the controller. The overall system energy recovery efficiency using regenerative braking was low, reaching a maximum of about 40% and falling as low as 10% when higher than expected power flows were used. The theoretical model was simplified by removing the effects of temperature and heat rise. Only with a built EVE can the actual performance of the system be characterized.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Matthew R. Zedler.en_US
dc.format.extent50 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleThe electric vehicle experiment : developing the theoretical model for 2.672en_US
dc.title.alternativeEVE : developing the theoretical model for 2.672en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc212409133en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record