Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorWilliam G. Thilly.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKao, Leslie Een_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-11-07T18:52:02Z
dc.date.available2008-11-07T18:52:02Z
dc.date.copyright2008en_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/43013
dc.descriptionThesis (S.B.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, 2008.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 69-76).en_US
dc.description.abstractConstant Denaturant Capillary Electrophoresis (CDCE) is a separation tool based on the cooperative melting equilibrium principle that is used to detect mutations as low as of 106. This technique has already demonstrated invaluable clinical applications in correlated preventative prognosis, medical evaluations, and interventions. Accordingly, there is a high demand to utilize CDCE as a cost-effective, high-throughput screening and separation technique to detect mutations in large DNA pooled samples. The aim of this thesis is twofold: to describe DNA separation theories and technologies, as well as CDCE separation theory and applications; and to describe and analyze the design of and modifications applied to an integrated automated multicapillary instrument with collection of mutant fractions by using CDCE to meet the stringent requirements for detecting low-frequency mutations in pooled samples from large populations. The modified SCE2410 24-capillary DNA Sequencer, HTMS Model (High-throughput Mutational Spectrometer) by Q. Li et al. has been identified as the instrument that best meets these requirements. This thesis will analyze this integrated HTMS instrumental design and modifications involving the multicapillary cartridge, the optical detection device, six independently controlled solid-state thermal heaters for the thermostat array in the CDCE temperature control system, and automated matrix replacement and fraction collection. The overall HTMS system design has led to results of high optical sensitivity (1 x 10-12M fluorescence in detection limits), precise and stable temperature control (± 0.010C), and automated sample delivery, injection, matrix replacement, and fraction collection.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Leslie E. Kao.en_US
dc.format.extent76 leavesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleCritical study on the development and design of an automated multicapillary electrophoresis instrument with collection of mutant DNA fractions using Constant Denaturant Capillary Electrophoresis (CDCE)en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc240685757en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record