Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorAnantha P. Chandrakasan.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOrguc, Sirmaen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-22T16:28:23Z
dc.date.available2016-12-22T16:28:23Z
dc.date.copyright2016en_US
dc.date.issued2016en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/106085
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2016.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 109-112).en_US
dc.description.abstractMiniaturized sensor nodes have a very tight power budget, especially in the case of implantables and health monitoring devices that require long operation lifetime. Exploiting low-voltage techniques in analog design can enable further power savings, which has not been explored much. However, for conventional analog-front-end (AFE) topologies, voltage scaling could potentially bring several limitations to the important performance metrics such as the linearity, robustness and the power-efficiency. This thesis work describes the design of a 0.3V biopotential sensor interface for stress monitoring applications, which achieves state-of-the-art power-efficiency, and ensures enough circuit reliability with reduced dynamic range requirement. The proposed sensor interface consists of an amplifier and an analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The simulated amplifier achieves 0.95nW power consumption with a power-efficiency-factor (PEF) of 1.57. With this power budget, the amplifier also presents large signal cancellation capability in order to reject the motion artifacts. The system, together with the ADC consumes 4.1nW power, and has an area of 0.2mm2 which makes the sensor interface suitable for wearable and implantable devices. The chip has been submitted for fabrication in a low power 65nm digital CMOS process, and the simulation results are presented.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Sirma Orguc.en_US
dc.format.extent112 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.title0.3V biopotential sensor interface for stress monitoringen_US
dc.title.alternativeZero point three volt biopotential sensor interface for stress monitoringen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc965294053en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record