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Nanometer-precision electron-beam lithography with applications in integrated optics

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dc.contributor.advisor Henry I. Smith. en_US
dc.contributor.author Hastings, Jeffrey Todd, 1975- en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2006-03-24T18:05:42Z
dc.date.available 2006-03-24T18:05:42Z
dc.date.copyright 2003 en_US
dc.date.issued 2003 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/29949
dc.description Thesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2003. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 179-185). en_US
dc.description.abstract Scanning electron-beam lithography (SEBL) provides sub-10-nm resolution and arbitrary-pattern generation; however, SEBL's pattern-placement accuracy remains inadequate for future integrated-circuits and integrated-optical devices. Environmental disturbances, system imperfections, charging, and a variety of other factors contribute to pattern-placement inaccuracy. To overcome these limitations, spatial-phase locked electron-beam lithography (SPLEBL) monitors the beam location with respect to a reference grid on the substrate. Phase detection of the periodic grid signal provides feedback control of the beam position to within a fraction of the period. Using this technique we exposed patterns globally locked to a fiducial grid and reduced local field-stitching errors to a < 1.3 nm. Spatial-phase locking is particularly important for integrated-optical devices that require pattern-placement accuracy within a fraction of the wavelength of light. As an example, Bragg-grating based optical filters were fabricated in silicon-on-insulator waveguides using SPLEBL. The filters were designed to reflect a narrow-range of wavelengths within the communications band near 1550-nm. We patterned the devices in a single lithography step by placing the gratings in the waveguide sidewalls. This design allows apodization of the filter response by lithographically varying the grating depth. Measured transmission spectra show greatly reduced sidelobe levels for apodized devices compared to devices with uniform gratings. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Jeffrey Todd Hastings. en_US
dc.format.extent 185 p. en_US
dc.format.extent 13694367 bytes
dc.format.extent 13694272 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subject Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. en_US
dc.title Nanometer-precision electron-beam lithography with applications in integrated optics en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree Ph.D. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 53277140 en_US


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