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Urban Studies and Planning (11) - Archived

Research and Teaching Output of the MIT Community

Urban Studies and Planning (11) - Archived

 

The Department of Urban Studies and Planning, established in 1932, was the second planning department in the U.S. and today is one of the largest planning departments nationally. DUSP excels at theorizing from practice and is particularly interested in how decisions are implemented and the impacts and benefits on those affected.

The department offers degree programs in the five specialization areas: City Design and Development (CDD), Environmental Policy Group (EPG), Housing, Community, and Economic Development (HCED), International Development and Regional Planning (IDRP) and Planning Support Systems (PSS). There are also two non-degree programs, the Center for Reflective Community Practice (CRCP) for mid-career community activists and the Special Program for Urban and Regional Studies (SPURS) for mid-career professionals in developing countries.

A wide range of field-based opportunities are available for students to work in collaboration with faculty on real-world planning problems. This unique tie between theoretical academic studies and field-based action research is one of the continuing allures of the program.

For more information, go to http://dusp.mit.edu .

Recent Submissions

  • Rajagopal, Balakrishnan (2010-12)
    This introductory survey course is intended to develop an understanding of key issues and dilemmas of planning in non-western countries. The topics covered in this course will include state intervention, governance, law ...
  • Salvucci, Frederick; Murga, Mikel (2002-12)
    This class is an introduction to planning transportation in metropolitan areas. The approach, while rooted on the analytical tools which estimate outcomes and alternatives, is holistic. This means starting from ...
  • Spirn, Anne Whiston (2005-12)
    This course explores the urban environment as a natural phenomenon, human habitat, medium of expression, and forum for action. The course has several major themes: how ideas of nature influence the way cities are perceived, ...
  • Beinart, Julian (2004-06)
    Theories about cities and the form that settlements should take will be discussed. Attempts will be made at a distinction between descriptive and normative theory, by examining examples of various theories of city form ...
  • MacLean, Alex; Spirn, Anne Whiston (2006-06)
    This course explores photography as a disciplined way of seeing, of investigating landscapes and expressing ideas. Readings, observations, and photographs form the basis of discussions on landscape, light, significant ...
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