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dc.contributor.advisorDirk R. Englund and Vladan Vuletić.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBunandar, Darius.en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Physics.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-08T19:43:29Z
dc.date.available2020-01-08T19:43:29Z
dc.date.copyright2019en_US
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/123414
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, 2019en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 177-188).en_US
dc.description.abstractSecure communication against any possible eavesdropper is important in today's Internet. Quantum key distribution (QKD), along with the one-time pad cryptosystem, provides a quantum-secure way for two distant parties to communicate with composable security. It has recently become clear that a wide-spread utilization of QKD warrants improvements in its implementations. Theoretically, the security of QKD is difficult to analyze and the effects of imperfections on key rates is difficult to estimate. Practically, QKD requires miniaturization and an operation speed comparable to current Internet communications. In this thesis, we develop a robust numerical approach for calculating the key rates for arbitrary QKD protocols with explicitly quantifiable security. The approach formulates semidefinite programs that take, as inputs, the observed statistics from a QKD session and outputs the guaranteed key rates. Next, in an effort to boost the operation speed of current QKD systems, we describe a large-alphabet QKD scheme that can transmit multiple secret bits of information per photon while being immune against a photon-number side channel attack. We also demonstrate the feasibility of this system with an intercity field demonstration that pushes the boundary on its key generation rate. We then present the miniaturization of QKD systems using the silicon photonics platform which allows for the integration of multiple high-speed photonic operations into a single circuit. We present the first intercity field demonstrations of QKD that demonstrates silicon photonics-supported by the currently existing CMOS technology-can pave the way for a high-speed metropolitan-scale quantum communication network.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Darius Bunandar.en_US
dc.format.extent188 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectPhysics.en_US
dc.titleAlgorithms and devices for metropolitan-scale quantum key distributionen_US
dc.title.alternativeAlgorithms and devices for metropolitan-scale QKDen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Physicsen_US
dc.identifier.oclc1134391965en_US
dc.description.collectionPh.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Physicsen_US
dspace.imported2020-01-08T19:43:28Zen_US
mit.thesis.degreeDoctoralen_US
mit.thesis.departmentPhysen_US


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