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Writing and Humanistic Studies (21W) - Archived

Research and Teaching Output of the MIT Community

Writing and Humanistic Studies (21W) - Archived

 

The MIT Program in Writing and Humanistic Studies gives students the opportunity to learn the techniques, forms, and traditions of several kinds of writing, from basic expository prose to more advanced forms of non-fictional prose, fiction and poetry, science writing, scientific and technical communication and digital media. Our faculty consists of novelists, essayists, poets, translators, biographers, historians, engineers, and scientists.

Program subjects are arranged by four areas: exposition and rhetoric, creative writing, science writing, and technical communication. In each area, introductory subjects lead to more specialized advanced subjects. Introductory subjects are designed for students with little experience in writing. Advanced subjects are for students who have mastered the elements of sentence and paragraph structure. A number of the advanced subjects use writing as a vehicle to explore humanistic and scientific issues in a broad cultural context.

The Graduate Program in Science Writing is a 12-month course of study leading to a Master of Science degree. Aimed at students who wish to write about science and technology for general readers, the program is built around an intensive two-semester advanced science-writing seminar. Links to other MIT programs and departments - such as the Knight Science Journalism Fellowships program, Comparative Media Studies, and the Program in Science, Technology and Society - provide rich resources for students who come to the Graduate Program in Science Writing from a variety of backgrounds.

For more information, go to http://web.mit.edu/humanistic/www/ .

Recent Submissions

  • Faery, Rebecca Blevins (2007-06)
    In The Souls of Black Folk (1903), the great cultural critic W. E. B. Du Bois wrote that "...the problem of the Twentieth Century is the problem of the color line." A century after Du Bois penned those words, most Americans ...
  • Lewitt, Shariann (2006-12)
    This class will focus on the craft of the short story, which we will explore through reading great short stories, writers speaking about writing, writing exercises and conducting workshops on original stories.
  • Staffilani, Gigliola; Vasy, Andras (2004-12)
    This course analyzes initial and boundary value problems for ordinary differential equations and the wave and heat equation in one space dimension. It also covers the Sturm-Liouville theory and eigenfunction expansions, ...
  • Klopfer, Eric (2004-12)
    This course provides an introduction to teaching and learning in a variety of K-12 settings. Through visits to schools, classroom discussions, selected readings, and hands-on activities, we explore the challenges and ...
  • Miller, Robert (2004-12)
    6.831 introduces the principles of user interface development, focusing on three key areas: Design: How to design good user interfaces, starting with human capabilities (including the human information processor model, ...
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