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dc.contributor.authorGuttman, Mitchell
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Pamela
dc.contributor.authorIngolia, Nicholas T.
dc.contributor.authorWeissman, Jonathan S.
dc.contributor.authorLander, Eric S.
dc.contributor.authorLander, Eric S.
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-25T14:02:12Z
dc.date.available2016-02-25T14:02:12Z
dc.date.issued2013-06
dc.date.submitted2013-06
dc.identifier.issn00928674
dc.identifier.issn1097-4172
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/101271
dc.description.abstractLarge noncoding RNAs are emerging as an important component in cellular regulation. Considerable evidence indicates that these transcripts act directly as functional RNAs rather than through an encoded protein product. However, a recent study of ribosome occupancy reported that many large intergenic ncRNAs (lincRNAs) are bound by ribosomes, raising the possibility that they are translated into proteins. Here, we show that classical noncoding RNAs and 5′ UTRs show the same ribosome occupancy as lincRNAs, demonstrating that ribosome occupancy alone is not sufficient to classify transcripts as coding or noncoding. Instead, we define a metric based on the known property of translation whereby translating ribosomes are released upon encountering a bona fide stop codon. We show that this metric accurately discriminates between protein-coding transcripts and all classes of known noncoding transcripts, including lincRNAs. Taken together, these results argue that the large majority of lincRNAs do not function through encoded proteins.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Health (U.S.) (Director’s Early Independence Award DP5OD012190)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Human Genome Research Institute (U.S.) (U54HG003067)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipBroad Institute of MIT and Harvarden_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2013.06.009en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivativesen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.sourcePMCen_US
dc.titleRibosome Profiling Provides Evidence that Large Noncoding RNAs Do Not Encode Proteinsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationGuttman, Mitchell, Pamela Russell, Nicholas T. Ingolia, Jonathan S. Weissman, and Eric S. Lander. “Ribosome Profiling Provides Evidence That Large Noncoding RNAs Do Not Encode Proteins.” Cell 154, no. 1 (July 2013): 240–251.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Biologyen_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorGuttman, Mitchellen_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorLander, Eric S.en_US
dc.relation.journalCellen_US
dc.eprint.versionAuthor's final manuscripten_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dspace.orderedauthorsGuttman, Mitchell; Russell, Pamela; Ingolia, Nicholas T.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Lander, Eric S.en_US
mit.licensePUBLISHER_CCen_US


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