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dc.contributor.authorNewman, Helen
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Fu-Chin
dc.contributor.authorGraybiel, Ann M.
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-09T14:34:13Z
dc.date.available2016-05-09T14:34:13Z
dc.date.issued2015-01
dc.date.submitted2014-12
dc.identifier.issn00219967
dc.identifier.issn1096-9861
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/102427
dc.description.abstractThe mature striatum is divided into a labyrinthine system of striosomes embedded in a surrounding matrix compartment. We pulse-labeled striosomal cells (S cells) and matrix cells (M cells) in cats with [superscript 3]H-thymidine and followed their distributions during fetal and postnatal development. We identified three maturational phases in S-cell distributions. The early phase (sampled at embryonic day [E]27–E35 following E24-E28 [superscript 3]H-thymidine) was characterized by a transient medial accumulation of synchronously generated S cells within the caudate nucleus adjoining the ganglionic eminence, potentially a waiting compartment. Band-like arrangements of synchronously generated S cells then formed beyond this medial band. During the second phase (sampled at E38–E45), the loosely banded S-cell distributions were transformed into clustered arrangements typical of developing striosomes. In the third phase (sampled from E52 into the postnatal period), these developed into the typical mature striosomal architecture. At adulthood, gentle mediolateral birthdate-gradients in S cells were still evident, but M cells, produced over mid to late prenatal ages, became broadly distributed, without apparent gradients or banding arrangements. These findings suggest that the maturational histories of the striosomal and matrix neurons are influenced by their generation times and local environments, and that future S cells have transient, nonstriosomal distributions prior to their aggregation into striosomal clusters, including a putative waiting compartment. Further, the eventual patterning of the striosomal compartment reflects outside-in, band-like gradient patterns of settling of synchronously generated S cells, patterns that could be related both to neural processing in the mature striatum and to patterns of vulnerability of striatal neurons.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWills Foundationen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipEunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (U.S.) (Grant R37 HD028341)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipHereditary Disease Foundation (U.S.)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCure Huntington’s Disease Initiative, Inc. (Grant A-5552)en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWiley Blackwellen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cne.23725en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alikeen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en_US
dc.sourcePMCen_US
dc.titleDynamic ordering of early generated striatal cells destined to form the striosomal compartment of the striatumen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationNewman, Helen, Fu-Chin Liu, and Ann M. Graybiel. “Dynamic Ordering of Early Generated Striatal Cells Destined to Form the Striosomal Compartment of the Striatum.” J. Comp. Neurol. 523, no. 6 (January 30, 2015): 943–962.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMcGovern Institute for Brain Research at MITen_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorGraybiel, Ann M.en_US
dc.relation.journalJournal of Comparative Neurologyen_US
dc.eprint.versionAuthor's final manuscripten_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dspace.orderedauthorsNewman, Helen; Liu, Fu-Chin; Graybiel, Ann M.en_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-4326-7720
mit.licenseOPEN_ACCESS_POLICYen_US


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