Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSchaal, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorSpringel, Volker
dc.contributor.authorPakmor, Rüdiger
dc.contributor.authorPfrommer, Christoph
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Dylan
dc.contributor.authorVogelsberger, Mark
dc.contributor.authorGenel, Shy
dc.contributor.authorPillepich, Annalisa
dc.contributor.authorSijacki, Debora
dc.contributor.authorHernquist, Lars
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-01T18:20:03Z
dc.date.available2017-05-01T18:20:03Z
dc.date.issued2016-07
dc.date.submitted2016-06
dc.identifier.issn0035-8711
dc.identifier.issn1365-2966
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/108546
dc.description.abstractHydrodynamical shocks are a manifestation of the non-linearity of the Euler equations and play a fundamental role in cosmological gas dynamics. In this work, we identify and analyse shocks in the Illustris simulation, and contrast the results with those of non-radiative runs. We show that simulations with more comprehensive physical models of galaxy formation pose new challenges for shock finding algorithms due to radiative cooling and star-forming processes, prompting us to develop a number of methodology improvements. We find in Illustris a total shock surface area which is about 1.4 times larger at the present epoch compared to non-radiative runs, and an energy dissipation rate at shocks which is higher by a factor of around 7. Remarkably, shocks with Mach numbers above and below M≈10 contribute about equally to the total dissipation across cosmic time. This is in sharp contrast to non-radiative simulations, and we demonstrate that a large part of the difference arises due to strong black hole radio-mode feedback in Illustris. We also provide an overview of the large diversity of shock morphologies, which includes complex networks of halo-internal shocks, shocks on to cosmic sheets, feedback shocks due to black holes and galactic winds, as well as ubiquitous accretion shocks. In high-redshift systems more massive than 10¹² M⊙, we discover the existence of a double accretion shock pattern in haloes. They are created when gas streams along filaments without being shocked at the outer accretion shock, but then forms a second, roughly spherical accretion shock further inside.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/mnras/stw1587en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alikeen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en_US
dc.sourcearXiven_US
dc.titleShock finding on a moving-mesh – II. Hydrodynamic shocks in the Illustris universeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationSchaal, Kevin; Springel, Volker; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Pfrommer, Christoph; Nelson, Dylan; Vogelsberger, Mark; Genel, Shy; Pillepich, Annalisa; Sijacki, Debora and Hernquist, Lars. “Shock Finding on a Moving-Mesh – II. Hydrodynamic Shocks in the Illustris Universe.” Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 461, no. 4 (July 2016): 4441–4465.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentKavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Researchen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Physicsen_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorVogelsberger, Mark
dc.relation.journalMonthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Societyen_US
dc.eprint.versionAuthor's final manuscripten_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dspace.orderedauthorsSchaal, Kevin; Springel, Volker; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Pfrommer, Christoph; Nelson, Dylan; Vogelsberger, Mark; Genel, Shy; Pillepich, Annalisa; Sijacki, Debora; Hernquist, Larsen_US
dspace.embargo.termsNen_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-8593-7692
mit.licenseOPEN_ACCESS_POLICYen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record