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dc.contributor.authorBruto, Maxime
dc.contributor.authorLabreuche, Yannick
dc.contributor.authorJames, Adèle
dc.contributor.authorPiel, Damien
dc.contributor.authorChenivesse, Sabine
dc.contributor.authorPetton, Bruno
dc.contributor.authorLe Roux, Frédérique
dc.contributor.authorPolz, Martin F
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-20T15:46:01Z
dc.date.available2018-08-20T15:46:01Z
dc.date.issued2018-07
dc.date.submitted2018-06
dc.identifier.issn1751-7362
dc.identifier.issn1751-7370
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/117414
dc.description.abstractDiseases of marine animals caused by bacteria of the genus Vibrio are on the rise worldwide. Understanding the eco-evolutionary dynamics of these infectious agents is important for predicting and managing these diseases. Yet, compared to Vibrio infecting humans, knowledge of their role as animal pathogens is scarce. Here we ask how widespread is virulence among ecologically differentiated Vibrio populations, and what is the nature and frequency of virulence genes within these populations? We use a combination of population genomics and molecular genetics to assay hundreds of Vibrio strains for their virulence in the oyster Crassostrea gigas, a unique animal model that allows high-throughput infection assays. We show that within the diverse Splendidus clade, virulence represents an ancestral trait but has been lost from several populations. Two loci are necessary for virulence, the first being widely distributed across the Splendidus clade and consisting of an exported conserved protein (R5.7). The second is a MARTX toxin cluster, which only occurs within V. splendidus and is for the first time associated with virulence in marine invertebrates. Varying frequencies of both loci among populations indicate different selective pressures and alternative ecological roles, based on which we suggest strategies for epidemiological surveys.en_US
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41396-018-0245-3en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licenseen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.sourceNatureen_US
dc.titleAncestral gene acquisition as the key to virulence potential in environmental Vibrio populationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationBruto, Maxime et al. “Ancestral Gene Acquisition as the Key to Virulence Potential in Environmental Vibrio Populations.” The ISME Journal (August 2018) © 2018 The Authorsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.departmentParsons Laboratory for Environmental Science and Engineering (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)en_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorPolz, Martin F
dc.relation.journalISME Journalen_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dc.date.updated2018-08-20T14:24:42Z
dspace.orderedauthorsBruto, Maxime; Labreuche, Yannick; James, Adèle; Piel, Damien; Chenivesse, Sabine; Petton, Bruno; Polz, Martin F.; Le Roux, Frédériqueen_US
dspace.embargo.termsNen_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-9296-3733
mit.licensePUBLISHER_CCen_US


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