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dc.contributor.authorPanch, Trishan
dc.contributor.authorMattie, Heather
dc.contributor.authorCeli, Leo Anthony G.
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-05T15:07:34Z
dc.date.available2020-06-05T15:07:34Z
dc.date.issued2019-08-16
dc.identifier.issn2398-6352
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/125684
dc.description.abstractAs the UK sits in painful deadlock over Brexit, it is important to remember that governments are regularly faced with crises, and their responses can create enduring benefit for future generations. Back in 1858, for example, the UK parliament was dealing with another messy crisis: “the great stink.” In a world before sanitation, the river Thames had become an open latrine, and as summer blossomed parliament was engulfed in a pestilential stench. £2.5 million (about £300 million in today’s money) was hastily approved to build a network of sewers throughout the capital.1 This particular model of sanitation, developed by Bazalgette, was adopted by other cities around the world and the rest, as they say, is history. It is now unthinkable that a developed nation would not have sanitation infrastructure. However, back in 1858 the debate was whether sanitation infrastructure was worthy of investment and whether it was a public or private good. A similar debate has been simmering for some time regarding health data infrastructure, defined as the hardware and software to securely aggregate, store, process and transmit healthcare data. Is data infrastructure necessary for healthcare organizations and if so, is it the responsibility of individual healthcare organizations, of local health systems, or is it a public good? [First paragraph]en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute of Health NIBIB (grant no. R01 EV017205)en_US
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen_US
dc.relation.isversionof10.1038/s41746-019-0155-4en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International licenseen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.sourceNatureen_US
dc.titleThe "inconvenient truth" about AI in healthcareen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationPanch, Trishan, Heather Mattie, and Leo Anthony Celi, "The 'inconvenient truth' about AI in healthcare." npj Digital Medicine 2, 1 (Aug. 2019): no. 77 doi 10.1038/s41746-019-0155-4 ©2019 Author(s)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Institute for Medical Engineering and Scienceen_US
dc.relation.journalnpj Digital Medicineen_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dspace.date.submission2019-12-10T14:21:40Z
mit.journal.volume2en_US
mit.journal.issue1en_US


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