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dc.contributor.authorBoury, Samuel
dc.contributor.authorPickart, Robert S.
dc.contributor.authorOdier, Philippe
dc.contributor.authorLin, Peigen
dc.contributor.authorLi, Min
dc.contributor.authorFine, Elizabeth C.
dc.contributor.authorSimmons, Harper L.
dc.contributor.authorMacKinnon, Jennifer A.
dc.contributor.authorPeacock, Thomas
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-17T15:25:42Z
dc.date.available2020-08-17T15:25:42Z
dc.date.issued2020-06
dc.date.submitted2019-11
dc.identifier.issn0022-3670
dc.identifier.issn1520-0485
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/126617
dc.description.abstractRecent measurements and modeling indicate that roughly half of the Pacific-origin water exiting the Chukchi Sea shelf through Barrow Canyon forms a westward-flowing current known as the Chukchi Slope Current (CSC), yet the trajectory and fate of this current is presently unknown. In this study, through the combined use of shipboard velocity data and information from five profiling floats deployed as quasi-Lagrangian particles, we delve further into the trajectory and the fate of the CSC. During the period of observation, from early September to early October 2018, the CSC progressed far to the north into the Chukchi Borderland. The northward excursion is believed to result from the current negotiating Hanna Canyon on the Chukchi slope, consistent with potential vorticity dynamics. The volume transport of the CSC, calculated using a set of shipboard transects, decreased from approximately 2 Sv (1 Sv ≡ 106 m3 s-1 ) to near zero over a period of 4 days. This variation can be explained by a concomitant change in the wind stress curl over the Chukchi shelf from positive to negative. After turning northward, the CSC was disrupted and four of the five floats veered offshore, with one of the floats permanently leaving the current. It is hypothesized that the observed disruption was due to an anticyclonic eddy interacting with the CSC, which has been observed previously. These results demonstrate that, at times, the CSC can get entrained into the Beaufort Gyre.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipONR (Grant N000141612450)en_US
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1175/jpo-d-19-0273.1en_US
dc.rightsArticle is made available in accordance with the publisher's policy and may be subject to US copyright law. Please refer to the publisher's site for terms of use.en_US
dc.sourceAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.titleWhither the Chukchi Slope Current?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationBoury, Samuel et al. "Whither the Chukchi Slope Current?." Journal of Physical Oceanography 50, 6 (June 2020): 1717–1732 © 2020 American Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.relation.journalJournal of Physical Oceanographyen_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dc.date.updated2020-07-31T15:41:43Z
dspace.date.submission2020-07-31T15:41:46Z
mit.journal.volume50en_US
mit.journal.issue6en_US
mit.licensePUBLISHER_POLICY


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