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dc.contributor.authorGuell Paradis, Xavier
dc.contributor.authorAnteraper, Sheeba Rani Arnold
dc.contributor.authorGhosh, Satrajit S
dc.contributor.authorGabrieli, John D. E.
dc.contributor.authorSchmahmann, Jeremy D.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T21:06:49Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T21:06:49Z
dc.date.issued2019-07
dc.identifier.issn1473-4222
dc.identifier.issn1473-4230
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/128508
dc.description.abstractA patient diagnosed with developmental delay, intellectual disability, and autistic and obsessive-compulsive symptoms was found to have a posterior fossa arachnoid cyst (PFAC) compressing the cerebellum. The patient was referred to our Ataxia Unit for consideration of surgical drainage of the cyst to improve his clinical constellation. This scenario led to an in-depth analysis including a literature review, functional resting-state MRI analysis of our patient compared to a group of controls, and genetic testing. While it is reasonable to consider that there may be a causal relationship between PFAC and neurodevelopmental or psychiatric symptoms in some patients, there is also a nontrivial prevalence of PFAC in the asymptomatic population and a significant possibility that many PFAC are incidental findings in the context of primary cognitive or psychiatric symptoms. Our functional MRI analysis is the first to examine brain function, and to report cerebellar dysfunction, in a patient presenting with cognitive/psychiatric symptoms found to have a structural abnormality compressing the cerebellum. These neuroimaging findings are inherently limited due to their correlational nature but provide unprecedented evidence suggesting that cerebellar compression may be associated with cerebellar dysfunction. Exome gene sequencing revealed additional etiological possibilities, highlighting the complexity of this field of cerebellar clinical and scientific practice. Our findings and discussion may guide future investigations addressing an important knowledge gap—namely, is there a link between cerebellar compression (including arachnoid cysts and possibly other forms of cerebellar compression such as Chiari malformation), cerebellar dysfunction (including fMRI abnormalities reported here), and neuropsychiatric symptoms?en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNIH (Grant R01 EB020740)en_US
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s12311-019-01050-4en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alikeen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en_US
dc.sourceSpringer USen_US
dc.titleNeurodevelopmental and Psychiatric Symptoms in Patients with a Cyst Compressing the Cerebellum: an Ongoing Enigmaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationGuell, Xavier et al. "Neurodevelopmental and Psychiatric Symptoms in Patients with a Cyst Compressing the Cerebellum: an Ongoing Enigma." The Cerebellum 19, 1 (July 2019): 16–29 © 2019 Springer Science Business Media, LLCen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMcGovern Institute for Brain Research at MITen_US
dc.relation.journalThe Cerebellumen_US
dc.eprint.versionAuthor's final manuscripten_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dc.date.updated2020-09-24T21:45:49Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.rights.holderSpringer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
dspace.embargo.termsY
dspace.date.submission2020-09-24T21:45:49Z
mit.journal.volume19en_US
mit.journal.issue1en_US
mit.licenseOPEN_ACCESS_POLICY


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