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dc.contributor.authorHoward, Evan M.
dc.contributor.authorSpivak, Amanda C.
dc.contributor.authorKarolewski, Jennifer S.
dc.contributor.authorGosselin, Kelsey M.
dc.contributor.authorSandwith, Zoe O.
dc.contributor.authorManning, Cara C.
dc.contributor.authorStanley, Rachel H. R.
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-01T23:27:21Z
dc.date.available2020-12-01T23:27:21Z
dc.date.issued2020-07
dc.date.submitted2020-05
dc.identifier.issn1559-2723
dc.identifier.issn1559-2731
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/128711
dc.description.abstractThe metabolism of estuarine environments is often estimated by measuring changes in dissolved oxygen concentrations. A central assumption of common oxygen-based approaches is that oxygen consumption rates (primarily respiration) are similar under light and dark conditions. Evaluating this assumption is critical, especially in benthic-dominated systems, because differences between daytime and nighttime respiration could result in underestimation or overestimation of ecosystem productivity. We evaluated rates of gross oxygen production over hourly to seasonal time scales in a shallow, temperate salt marsh pond. To assess whether a dissolved oxygen diel mass balance underestimated gross oxygen productivity, we compared rates using this traditional approach and using the triple oxygen isotope tracer of photosynthesis. This is a powerful combination because the triple oxygen isotope approach is theoretically insensitive to respiration. The methods agreed well over daily to seasonal time scales. However, during midday periods of peak light and productivity, the triple oxygen isotope approach resulted in higher hourly scale gross oxygen production rates. The timing and magnitude of this short-term difference is consistent with light-dependent oxygen uptake fluxes including photoreduction and/or light-stimulated community respiration. Finally, aquatic vegetation was associated with variability in productivity across the pond. Such small-scale environmental heterogeneity is evidence that this shallow pond was not laterally well mixed, and likely contributes to the dynamism of these common estuarine environments.en_US
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s12237-020-00757-6en_US
dc.rightsArticle is made available in accordance with the publisher's policy and may be subject to US copyright law. Please refer to the publisher's site for terms of use.en_US
dc.sourceSpringer USen_US
dc.titleOxygen and Triple Oxygen Isotope Measurements Provide Different Insights into Gross Oxygen Production in a Shallow Salt Marsh Ponden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationHoward, Evan M. et al. "Oxygen and Triple Oxygen Isotope Measurements Provide Different Insights into Gross Oxygen Production in a Shallow Salt Marsh Pond." Estuaries and Coasts 43, 8 (December 2020): 1908–1922 © 2020 Coastal and Estuarine Research Federationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentWoods Hole Oceanographic Institutionen_US
dc.contributor.departmentJoint Program in Oceanographyen_US
dc.relation.journalEstuaries and Coastsen_US
dc.eprint.versionAuthor's final manuscripten_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dc.date.updated2020-10-22T03:25:42Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.rights.holderCoastal and Estuarine Research Federation
dspace.embargo.termsY
dspace.date.submission2020-10-22T03:25:42Z
mit.journal.volume43en_US
mit.journal.issue8en_US
mit.licensePUBLISHER_POLICY


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