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dc.contributor.authorVogelsang, Lukas
dc.contributor.authorGilad-Gutnick, Sharon
dc.contributor.authorEhrenberg, Evan
dc.contributor.authorYonas, Albert
dc.contributor.authorDiamond, Sidney
dc.contributor.authorHeld, Richard M.
dc.contributor.authorSinha, Pawan
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-29T15:11:44Z
dc.date.available2021-01-29T15:11:44Z
dc.date.issued2018-10
dc.date.submitted2018-01
dc.identifier.issn1091-6490
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/129594
dc.description.abstractChildren who are treated for congenital cataracts later exhibit impairments in configural face analysis. This has been explained in terms of a critical period for the acquisition of normal face processing. Here, we consider a more parsimonious account according to which deficits in configural analysis result from the abnormally high initial retinal acuity that children treated for cataracts experience, relative to typical newborns. According to this proposal, the initial period of low retinal acuity characteristic of normal visual development induces extended spatial processing in the cortex that is important for configural face judgments. As a computational test of this hypothesis, we examined the effects of training with high-resolution or blurred images, and staged combinations, on the receptive fields and performance of a convolutional neural network. The results show that commencing trainingwith blurred images creates receptive fields that integrate information across larger image areas and leads to improved performance and better generalization across a range of resolutions. These findings offer an explanation for the observed face recognition impairments after late treatment of congenital blindness, suggest an adaptive function for the acuity trajectory in normal development, and provide a scheme for improving the performance of computational face recognition systems. ©2018 National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNick Simons Foundationen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Eye Institute Grant (EYR01020517)en_US
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherProceedings of the National Academy of Sciencesen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://dx.doi.org/10.1073/PNAS.1800901115en_US
dc.rightsArticle is made available in accordance with the publisher's policy and may be subject to US copyright law. Please refer to the publisher's site for terms of use.en_US
dc.sourcePNASen_US
dc.titlePotential downside of high initial visual acuityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationVogelsang, Lukas et al., "Potential downside of high initial visual acuity." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 115, 44 (October 2018): 11333-38 ©2018 Authorsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciencesen_US
dc.relation.journalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of Americaen_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dc.date.updated2019-09-16T13:58:52Z
dspace.date.submission2019-09-16T13:58:54Z
mit.journal.volume115en_US
mit.journal.issue44en_US
mit.metadata.statusComplete


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