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dc.contributor.authorRobinson-McCarthy, Lindsey R.
dc.contributor.authorMijalis, Alexander J.
dc.contributor.authorFilsinger, Gabriel T.
dc.contributor.authorde Puig Guixe, Helena
dc.contributor.authorDonghia, Nina M.
dc.contributor.authorSchaus, Thomas E.
dc.contributor.authorRasmussen, Robert A.
dc.contributor.authorFerreira, Raphael
dc.contributor.authorLunshof, Jeantine E.
dc.contributor.authorChao, George
dc.contributor.authorTer-Ovanesyan, Dmitry
dc.contributor.authorDodd, Oliver
dc.contributor.authorKuru, Erkin
dc.contributor.authorSesay, Adama M.
dc.contributor.authorRainbow, Joshua
dc.contributor.authorPawlowski, Andrew C.
dc.contributor.authorWannier, Timothy M.
dc.contributor.authorAngenent-Mari, Nicolaas M.
dc.contributor.authorNajjar, Devora
dc.contributor.authorYin, Peng
dc.contributor.authorIngber, Donald E.
dc.contributor.authorTam, Jenny M.
dc.contributor.authorChurch, George M.
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-17T14:43:59Z
dc.date.available2021-09-17T14:43:59Z
dc.date.issued2021-09
dc.date.submitted2021-05
dc.identifier.issn2165-0497
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/131289
dc.description.abstractThe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has brought about the unprecedented expansion of highly sensitive molecular diagnostics as a primary infection control strategy. At the same time, many laboratories have shifted focus to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) research and diagnostic development, leading to large-scale production of SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acids that can interfere with these tests. We have identified multiple instances, in independent laboratories, in which nucleic acids generated in research settings are suspected to have caused researchers to test positive for SARS-CoV-2 in surveillance testing. In some cases, the affected individuals did not work directly with these nucleic acids but were exposed via a contaminated surface or object. Though researchers have long been vigilant of DNA contaminants, the transfer of these contaminants to SARS-CoV-2 testing samples can result in anomalous test results. The impact of these incidents stretches into the public sphere, placing additional burdens on public health resources, placing affected researchers and their contacts in isolation and quarantine, removing them from the testing pool for 3 months, and carrying the potential to trigger shutdowns of classrooms and workplaces. We report our observations as a call for increased stewardship over nucleic acids with the potential to impact both the use and development of diagnostics.en_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiologyen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1128/spectrum.00313-21en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International licenseen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.sourceAmerican Society for Microbiologyen_US
dc.titleLaboratory-Generated DNA Can Cause Anomalous Pathogen Diagnostic Test Resultsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationRobinson-McCarthy, Lindsey R. et al. "Laboratory-Generated DNA Can Cause Anomalous Pathogen Diagnostic Test Results." Microbiology Spectrum 9, 2 (October 2021): e00313-21. © 2021 Robinson-McCarthy et alen_US
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute for Medical Engineering and Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Biological Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Media Laboratoryen_US
dc.relation.journalMicrobiology Spectrumen_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dspace.date.submission2021-09-17T11:44:28Z
mit.journal.volume9en_US
mit.journal.issue2en_US
mit.licensePUBLISHER_CC
mit.metadata.statusCompleteen_US


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