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dc.contributor.authorShahsafi, Alireza
dc.contributor.authorRoney, Patrick
dc.contributor.authorZhou, You
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Zhen
dc.contributor.authorXiao, Yuzhe
dc.contributor.authorWan, Chenghao
dc.contributor.authorWambold, Raymond
dc.contributor.authorSalman, Jad
dc.contributor.authorYu, Zhaoning
dc.contributor.authorLi, Jiarui
dc.contributor.authorSadowski, Jerzy T
dc.contributor.authorComin, Riccardo
dc.contributor.authorRamanathan, Shriram
dc.contributor.authorKats, Mikhail A
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-27T19:57:50Z
dc.date.available2021-10-27T19:57:50Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/134056
dc.description.abstract© 2019 National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. Thermal emission is the process by which all objects at nonzero temperatures emit light and is well described by the Planck, Kirchhoff, and Stefan-Boltzmann laws. For most solids, the thermally emitted power increases monotonically with temperature in a one-to-one relationship that enables applications such as infrared imaging and noncontact thermometry. Here, we demonstrated ultrathin thermal emitters that violate this one-to-one relationship via the use of samarium nickel oxide (SmNiO3), a strongly correlated quantum material that undergoes a fully reversible, temperaturedriven solid-state phase transition. The smooth and hysteresis-free nature of this unique insulator-to-metal phase transition enabled us to engineer the temperature dependence of emissivity to precisely cancel out the intrinsic blackbody profile described by the Stefan- Boltzmann law, for both heating and cooling. Our design results in temperature-independent thermally emitted power within the long-wave atmospheric transparency window (wavelengths of 8 to 14 μm), across a broad temperature range of ~30 °C, centered around ~120 °C. The ability to decouple temperature and thermal emission opens a gateway for controlling the visibility of objects to infrared cameras and, more broadly, opportunities for quantum materials in controlling heat transfer.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
dc.relation.isversionof10.1073/PNAS.1911244116
dc.rightsArticle is made available in accordance with the publisher's policy and may be subject to US copyright law. Please refer to the publisher's site for terms of use.
dc.sourcePNAS
dc.titleTemperature-independent thermal radiation
dc.typeArticle
dc.relation.journalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerReviewed
dc.date.updated2020-09-22T18:38:28Z
dspace.orderedauthorsShahsafi, A; Roney, P; Zhou, Y; Zhang, Z; Xiao, Y; Wan, C; Wambold, R; Salman, J; Yu, Z; Li, J; Sadowski, JT; Comin, R; Ramanathan, S; Kats, MA
dspace.date.submission2020-09-22T18:38:35Z
mit.journal.volume116
mit.journal.issue52
mit.licensePUBLISHER_POLICY
mit.metadata.statusAuthority Work and Publication Information Needed


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