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dc.contributor.authorPezolet, Nicola
dc.date.accessioned2010-06-25T15:31:31Z
dc.date.available2010-06-25T15:31:31Z
dc.date.issued2010-02
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/55965
dc.description.abstractDuring its formative years (1957–1960), the Situationist International (SI) charted a paradoxical relationship between an enthusiasm for a technological future and a surrealist longing for the premodern. In the first installments of the Internationale situationniste, alongside articles by Asger Jorn, Giuseppe “Pinot” Gallizio, and others are several unsigned articles, most of which were written by the editor, Guy-Ernest Debord, advocating the “destruction of the subject” and the use of contemporary machines to systematize and consciously organize “what the Surrealists had still experienced as random, as the marvelous.”1 According to Debord, the surrealists originally provided useful insights in their indictment of bourgeois society but soon regressed into an occultist movement that failed to recognize the potential of modern “conditioning techniques.”2 As a response to such a deterioration of surrealism’s subversive potential and its cooptation by commercial interests, Gallizio’s “industrial paintings” were championed by Debord as a new technological form of creativity that would bring a fatal blow to the outdated avant-garde and that could be used to create liberating, transitory “situations” signaling the emergence of a revolutionary movement.3 By using “industrial painting”—as well as détournement and several other technological and scientific metaphors—Debord attempted to work through the influential practices of André Breton’s group, which still occupied a prominent role in postwar Europe.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMIT Press Journalsen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1162/grey.2010.1.38.62en_US
dc.rightsArticle is made available in accordance with the publisher's policy and may be subject to US copyright law. Please refer to the publisher's site for terms of use.en_US
dc.sourceMIT Pressen_US
dc.titleThe Cavern of Antimatter: Giuseppe "Pinot" Gallizio and the Technological Imaginary of the Early Situationist Internationalen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationNicola Pezolet, "The Cavern of Antimatter: Giuseppe "Pinot" Gallizio and the Technological Imaginary of the Early Situationist International," Grey Room, Winter 2010, No. 38, Pages 62-89. (doi:10.1162/grey.2010.1.38.62) © 2010 by Grey Room, Inc. and the Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.approverPezolet, Nicola
dc.contributor.mitauthorPezolet, Nicola
dc.relation.journalGrey Roomen_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dspace.orderedauthorsPezolet, Nicolaen
mit.licensePUBLISHER_POLICYen_US


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