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dc.contributor.authorGraybiel, Ann M.
dc.contributor.authorErickson, Kirk I.
dc.contributor.authorBoot, Walter R.
dc.contributor.authorBasak, Chandramallika
dc.contributor.authorNeider, Mark B.
dc.contributor.authorPrakash, Ruchika S.
dc.contributor.authorVoss, Michelle W.
dc.contributor.authorGraybiel, Ann M.
dc.contributor.authorSimons, Daniel J.
dc.contributor.authorFabiani, Monica
dc.contributor.authorGratton, Gabriele
dc.contributor.authorKramer, Arthur F.
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-22T16:14:34Z
dc.date.available2011-06-22T16:14:34Z
dc.date.issued2010-11
dc.identifier.issn1047-3211
dc.identifier.issn1460-2199
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/64648
dc.description.abstractVideo game skills transfer to other tasks, but individual differences in performance and in learning and transfer rates make it difficult to identify the source of transfer benefits. We asked whether variability in initial acquisition and of improvement in performance on a demanding video game, the Space Fortress game, could be predicted by variations in the pretraining volume of either of 2 key brain regions implicated in learning and memory: the striatum, implicated in procedural learning and cognitive flexibility, and the hippocampus, implicated in declarative memory. We found that hippocampal volumes did not predict learning improvement but that striatal volumes did. Moreover, for the striatum, the volumes of the dorsal striatum predicted improvement in performance but the volumes of the ventral striatum did not. Both ventral and dorsal striatal volumes predicted early acquisition rates. Furthermore, this early-stage correlation between striatal volumes and learning held regardless of the cognitive flexibility demands of the game versions, whereas the predictive power of the dorsal striatal volumes held selectively for performance improvements in a game version emphasizing cognitive flexibility. These findings suggest a neuroanatomical basis for the superiority of training strategies that promote cognitive flexibility and transfer to untrained tasks.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUnited States. Office of Naval Research (grant number N00014-07-1-0903)en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhp293en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/en_US
dc.sourceProf. Graybiel via Lisa Horowitzen_US
dc.titleStriatal Volume Predicts Level of Video Game Skill Acquisitionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationErickson, Kirk I. et al. “Striatal Volume Predicts Level of Video Game Skill Acquisition.” Cerebral Cortex 20.11 (2010) : 2522 -2530.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentdeleteen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMcGovern Institute for Brain Research at MITen_US
dc.contributor.approverGraybiel, Ann M.
dc.contributor.mitauthorGraybiel, Ann M.
dc.relation.journalCerebral Cortexen_US
dc.eprint.versionAuthor's final manuscripten_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dspace.orderedauthorsErickson, K. I.; Boot, W. R.; Basak, C.; Neider, M. B.; Prakash, R. S.; Voss, M. W.; Graybiel, A. M.; Simons, D. J.; Fabiani, M.; Gratton, G.; Kramer, A. F.en
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-4326-7720
mit.licenseOPEN_ACCESS_POLICYen_US


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