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dc.contributor.authorHanna, Steven
dc.contributor.authorMarciotto, Edson
dc.contributor.authorBritter, Rex E.
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-01T20:17:14Z
dc.date.available2011-12-01T20:17:14Z
dc.date.issued2011-06
dc.date.submitted2010-05
dc.identifier.issn1558-8424
dc.identifier.issn1558-8432
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/67345
dc.description.abstractSurface energy fluxes, at averaging times from 10 min to 1 h, are needed as inputs to most state-of-the-art dispersion models. The sensible heat flux is a major priority, because it is combined with the momentum flux to estimate the stability, the wind profile, and the turbulence intensities. Because of recent concerns about dispersion in built-up downtown areas of large cities, there is a need to estimate sensible heat flux in the midst of tall buildings. In this paper, the authors work with some high-quality and relevant but arguably underutilized data. The results of analysis of urban heat flux components from 10 locations in suburban and built-up downtown areas in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, during the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field experiment are presented here. At street level in the downtown area, in the midst of tall skyscrapers, the ground heat flux and the sensible heat flux are relatively large and the latent heat flux is relatively small when compared with concurrent fluxes observed in the upwind suburban areas. In confirmation of measurements in other cities, the sensible heat flux in the downtown area is observed to be slightly positive (10–20 W m[superscript −2]) at night, indicating nearly neutral or slightly unstable conditions. Also in agreement with observations in other cities is that the ground heat flux in the downtown area has a magnitude that is 3 or 4 times that in suburban or rural areas. These results should permit improved parameterizations of sensible heat fluxes in the urban downtown area with tall buildings.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation (U.S.) (Award 0750878)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSingapore. National Research Foundationen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSingapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technologyen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSingapore-MIT Alliance. Center for Environmental Sensing and Monitoringen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1175/2011jamc2555.1en_US
dc.rightsArticle is made available in accordance with the publisher's policy and may be subject to US copyright law. Please refer to the publisher's site for terms of use.en_US
dc.sourceAMSen_US
dc.titleUrban Energy Fluxes in Built-Up Downtown Areas and Variations across the Urban Area, for Use in Dispersion Modelsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationHanna, Steven, Edson Marciotto, and Rex Britter. “Urban Energy Fluxes in Built-Up Downtown Areas and Variations across the Urban Area, for Use in Dispersion Models.” Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology 50 (2011): 1341-1353. Web. 1 Dec. 2011. © 2011 American Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planningen_US
dc.contributor.approverBritter, Rex E.
dc.contributor.mitauthorBritter, Rex E.
dc.relation.journalJournal of Applied Meteorology and Climatologyen_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dspace.orderedauthorsHanna, Steven; Marciotto, Edson; Britter, Rexen
mit.licensePUBLISHER_POLICYen_US


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