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Ocean Renewable Energy Storage (ORES) System: Analysis of an Undersea Energy Storage Concept

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dc.contributor.author Slocum, Alexander H.
dc.contributor.author Fennell, Gregory E.
dc.contributor.author Dundar, Gokhan
dc.contributor.author Hodder, Brian
dc.contributor.author Meredith, James D. C.
dc.contributor.author Sager, Monique A.
dc.date.accessioned 2013-05-23T19:20:01Z
dc.date.available 2013-05-23T19:20:01Z
dc.date.issued 2013-03
dc.date.submitted 2012-10
dc.identifier.issn 0018-9219
dc.identifier.other INSPEC Accession Number: 13370104
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/78934
dc.description.abstract Due to its higher capacity factor and proximity to densely populated areas, offshore wind power with integrated energy storage could satisfy > 20% of U.S. electricity demand. Similar results could also be obtained in many parts of the world. The offshore environment can be used for unobtrusive, safe, and economical utility-scale energy storage by taking advantage of the hydrostatic pressure at ocean depths to store energy by pumping water out of concrete spheres and later allowing it to flow back in through a turbine to generate electricity. The storage spheres are an ideal complement to energy harvesting machines, such as floating wind turbines (FWTs). The system could provide near-base-load-quality utility-scale renewable energy and do double duty as the anchoring point for the generation platforms. Analysis indicates that storage can be economically feasible at depths as shallow as 200 m, with cost per megawatt hour of storage dropping until 1500 m before beginning to trend upward. The sweet spot occurs when the concrete wall thickness to withstand the hydrostatic pressure provides enough ballast mass, and this will depend on the strength of used concrete and reinforcement. In addition, the required concrete would use significant amounts of fly ash from coal-fired power plants, and the spheres can serve as artificial reefs. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Energy Initiative en_US
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers en_US
dc.relation.isversionof http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/JPROC.2013.2242411 en_US
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 en_US
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ en_US
dc.source Prof. Slocum via Angie Locknar en_US
dc.title Ocean Renewable Energy Storage (ORES) System: Analysis of an Undersea Energy Storage Concept en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.identifier.citation Slocum, Alexander H., Gregory E. Fennell, Gökhan Dundar, et al. 2013. "Ocean Renewable Energy Storage (ORES) System: Analysis of an Undersea Energy Storage Concept." Proceedings of the IEEE 101(4): 906–924. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering en_US
dc.contributor.approver Slocum, Alexander H. en_US
dc.contributor.mitauthor Slocum, Alexander H. en_US
dc.contributor.mitauthor Dundar, Gokhan en_US
dc.contributor.mitauthor Hodder, Brian en_US
dc.contributor.mitauthor Meredith, James D. C. en_US
dc.relation.journal Proceedings of the IEEE en_US
dc.identifier.mitlicense OPEN_ACCESS_POLICY en_US
dc.eprint.version Author's final manuscript en_US
dc.type.uri http://purl.org/eprint/type/ConferencePaper en_US
eprint.status http://purl.org/eprint/status/NonPeerReviewed en_US
dspace.orderedauthors Slocum, A. H.; Fennell, G. E.; Dundar, G.; Hodder, B. G.; Meredith, J. D. C.; Sager, M. A. en_US
dc.identifier.orcid https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5048-4109


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