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dc.contributor.authorLevy, Roger
dc.contributor.authorGibson, Edward A.
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-03T15:51:26Z
dc.date.available2013-09-03T15:51:26Z
dc.date.issued2013-05
dc.date.submitted2013-02
dc.identifier.issn1664-1078
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/80342
dc.description.abstractOf the ambitious purview of MacDonald's (2013) article, we find the part fleshed out in most concrete detail—the comprehension consequences of her Production-Distribution-Comprehension (PDC) theory, the easiest to comment upon. Such a theory as she has sketched out would be extraordinarily compelling: a theory that, in contrast with accounts relying on “innate parsing biases,” posits that “comprehension results reflect distributional regularities in the language” that “comprehenders are generating expectations for upcoming input,” places “emphasis on the role of learning probabilistic constraints,” makes use of “extensive language corpora” to “[permit] comprehension researchers to examine the relationship between production patterns … and comprehension behavior” and thereby “reframes our understanding of sentence comprehension.” The only way we can see such a theory being more compelling would be for it to be specified precisely enough to be computationally implementable and to make quantitative and localized predictions about the processing difficulty of every word in a sentence that could be tested rigorously on a variety of linguistic materials. A naïve reader of MacDonald's article may not know that such a theory already exists and has been highly successful. This theory, known as surprisal, was first proposed by Hale (2001), building on early ideas by Attneave (1959) from the dawn of information theory (Shannon, 1948) and cognitive science.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundationen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00229en_US
dc.rightsArticle is made available in accordance with the publisher's policy and may be subject to US copyright law. Please refer to the publisher's site for terms of use.en_US
dc.sourceFrontiers Research Foundationen_US
dc.titleSurprisal, the PDC, and the primary locus of processing difficulty in relative clausesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationLevy, Roger, and Edward Gibson. “Surprisal, the PDC, and the primary locus of processing difficulty in relative clauses.” Frontiers in Psychology 4 (2013).en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Linguistics and Philosophyen_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorLevy, Rogeren_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorGibson, Edward A.en_US
dc.relation.journalFrontiers in Psychologyen_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dspace.orderedauthorsLevy, Roger; Gibson, Edwarden_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-5912-883X
mit.licensePUBLISHER_POLICYen_US


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