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dc.contributor.authorKaiser, David I.
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-10T20:45:42Z
dc.date.available2013-12-10T20:45:42Z
dc.date.issued2012-03
dc.identifier.issn00211753
dc.identifier.issn15456994
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/82907
dc.description.abstractThough the notion of a scientific textbook has been around for almost three centuries, the category has hardly been stable. The plasticity of the textbook genre may be illustrated by recent variations as well as long-term trends. In this brief essay I examine two idiosyncratic but highly successful physics books, each published in the mid 1970s, whose production, marketing, and adoption reveal some of the slippage between such categories as textbook, scholarly monograph, and popular best seller.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Chicago Press/History of Science Societyen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1086/664983en_US
dc.rightsArticle is made available in accordance with the publisher's policy and may be subject to US copyright law. Please refer to the publisher's site for terms of use.en_US
dc.sourceJstoren_US
dc.titleA Tale of Two Textbooks: Experiments in Genreen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationKaiser, David. “A Tale of Two Textbooks: Experiments in Genre.” Isis 103, no. 1 (March 2012): 126-138.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Physicsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Program in Science, Technology and Societyen_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorKaiser, David I.en_US
dc.relation.journalIsisen_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dspace.orderedauthorsKaiser, Daviden_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-5054-6744
mit.licensePUBLISHER_POLICYen_US


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