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dc.contributor.authorNenad, Miljkovic
dc.contributor.authorRong, Xiao
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Enright
dc.contributor.authorIan, McKay
dc.contributor.authorPreston, Daniel John
dc.contributor.authorWang, Evelyn N.
dc.contributor.authorMiljkovic, Nenad
dc.contributor.authorXiao, Rong
dc.contributor.authorEnright, Ryan
dc.contributor.authorMcKay, Ian
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-19T14:17:43Z
dc.date.available2014-02-19T14:17:43Z
dc.date.issued2013-07
dc.date.submitted2013-03
dc.identifier.issn0022-1481
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/84996
dc.description.abstractColor images of steady state water vapor condensing on smooth and nanostructured hydrophobic surfaces are presented. Figure 1a shows a snapshot of classical filmwise condensation on hydrophilic copper. A thin liquid film forms on the high surface energy substrate and acts as a conduction barrier for heat transfer. Figure 1b shows dropwise condensation on a copper tube made hydrophobic via deposition of a tri-chloro silane (TFTS). Discrete droplets form on the surface and, upon reaching a size comparable to the capillary length (≈2.7 mm), depart from the surface by gravitational sweeping. Figure 1c shows jumping-droplet condensation on a nanostructured superhydrophobic copper oxide (CuO) surface. When droplets coalesce on this surface, the resulting droplet can jump due to the release of excess surface energy (Figure 2b), and as a result, rapid droplet jumping is observed at micrometric length scales (R < 20 μm). Figure 1d shows a novel mode of condensation called ‘immersion’ condensation, where nucleation density is drastically increased while maintaining easy condensate removal (R < 500 μm) and low contact angles (<120˚). This approach utilizes an oil-infused nanostructured CuO surface with a heterogeneous coating which allows droplets to nucleate immersed within the oil (Figure 2c). The increase in nucleation density is achieved due to the combined effect of surface energy heterogeneity and a reduced oil-water interfacial energy. Figure 2a shows a schematic of the experimental setup. The visualizations provide insight into the complex droplet-surface interactions, which are important for the development of enhanced phase change surfaces. If designed properly, these surfaces not only allow for easy droplet removal at micrometric length scales during condensation but also promise to enhance heat transfer performance.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherASME Internationalen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1115/1.4024188en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alikeen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en_US
dc.sourceNenad Miljkovicen_US
dc.titleCondensation on Hydrophilic, Hydrophobic, Nanostructured Superhydrophobic and Oil-Infused Surfacesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationNenad, Miljkovic et al. “Condensation on Hydrophilic, Hydrophobic, Nanostructured Superhydrophobic and Oil-Infused Surfaces.” Journal of Heat Transfer 135.8 (2013): 080906.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.approverMiljkovic, Nenaden_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorMiljkovic, Nenaden_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorXiao, Rongen_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorEnright, Ryanen_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorMcKay, Ianen_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorPreston, Daniel Johnen_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorWang, Evelyn N.en_US
dc.relation.journalJournal of Heat Transferen_US
dc.eprint.versionAuthor's final manuscripten_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/NonPeerRevieweden_US
dspace.orderedauthorsNenad, Miljkovic; Rong, Xiao; Preston, Daniel John; Enright, Ryan; McKay, Ian; Wang, Evelyn N.en_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-7045-1200
mit.licenseOPEN_ACCESS_POLICYen_US


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