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dc.contributor.authorGard, Tim
dc.contributor.authorTaquet, Maxime
dc.contributor.authorDixit, Rohan
dc.contributor.authorHolzel, Britta K.
dc.contributor.authorde Montjoye, Yves-Alexandre
dc.contributor.authorBrach, Narayan
dc.contributor.authorSalat, David H.
dc.contributor.authorDickerson, Bradford C.
dc.contributor.authorGray, Jeremy R.
dc.contributor.authorLazar, Sara W.
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-19T18:09:53Z
dc.date.available2014-06-19T18:09:53Z
dc.date.issued2014-04
dc.identifier.issn1663-4365
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/88030
dc.description.abstractNumerous studies have documented the normal age-related decline of neural structure, function, and cognitive performance. Preliminary evidence suggests that meditation may reduce decline in specific cognitive domains and in brain structure. Here we extended this research by investigating the relation between age and fluid intelligence and resting state brain functional network architecture using graph theory, in middle-aged yoga and meditation practitioners, and matched controls. Fluid intelligence declined slower in yoga practitioners and meditators combined than in controls. Resting state functional networks of yoga practitioners and meditators combined were more integrated and more resilient to damage than those of controls. Furthermore, mindfulness was positively correlated with fluid intelligence, resilience, and global network efficiency. These findings reveal the possibility to increase resilience and to slow the decline of fluid intelligence and brain functional architecture and suggest that mindfulness plays a mechanistic role in this preservation.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Health (U.S.) (NIH award R21AT003673)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUnited States. Dept. of Health and Human Services (Shared Instrumentation Grant Program, Grant 1S10RR023401)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUnited States. Dept. of Health and Human Services (Shared Instrumentation Grant Program, Grant S10RR019307)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUnited States. Dept. of Health and Human Services (Shared Instrumentation Grant Program, Grant 1S10RR023043)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKripalu Institute for Extraordinary Livingen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundationen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnagi.2014.00076en_US
dc.rightsArticle is made available in accordance with the publisher's policy and may be subject to US copyright law. Please refer to the publisher's site for terms of use.en_US
dc.sourceFrontiers Research Foundationen_US
dc.titleFluid intelligence and brain functional organization in aging yoga and meditation practitionersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationGard, Tim, Maxime Taquet, Rohan Dixit, Britta K. Hölzel, Yves-Alexandre de Montjoye, Narayan Brach, David H. Salat, Bradford C. Dickerson, Jeremy R. Gray, and Sara W. Lazar. “Fluid Intelligence and Brain Functional Organization in Aging Yoga and Meditation Practitioners.” Front. Aging Neurosci. 6 (April 22, 2014).en_US
dc.contributor.departmentProgram in Media Arts and Sciences (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)en_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorde Montjoye, Yves-Alexandreen_US
dc.relation.journalFrontiers in Aging Neuroscienceen_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dspace.orderedauthorsGard, Tim; Taquet, Maxime; Dixit, Rohan; Hölzel, Britta K.; de Montjoye, Yves-Alexandre; Brach, Narayan; Salat, David H.; Dickerson, Bradford C.; Gray, Jeremy R.; Lazar, Sara W.en_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-9086-589X
mit.licensePUBLISHER_POLICYen_US


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