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dc.contributor.authorFeng, Guoping
dc.contributor.authorTing, Jonathan Thomas
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-30T12:18:54Z
dc.date.available2014-06-30T12:18:54Z
dc.date.issued2014-04
dc.date.submitted2014-01
dc.identifier.issn1662-5153
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/88112
dc.description.abstractThe development and application of diverse BAC transgenic rodent lines has enabled rapid progress for precise molecular targeting of genetically-defined cell types in the mammalian central nervous system. These transgenic tools have played a central role in the optogenetic revolution in neuroscience. Indeed, an overwhelming proportion of studies in this field have made use of BAC transgenic Cre driver lines to achieve targeted expression of optogenetic probes in the brain. In addition, several BAC transgenic mouse lines have been established for direct cell-type specific expression of Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2). While the benefits of these new tools largely outweigh any accompanying challenges, many available BAC transgenic lines may suffer from confounds due in part to increased gene dosage of one or more “extra” genes contained within the large BAC DNA sequences. Here we discuss this under-appreciated issue and propose strategies for developing the next generation of BAC transgenic lines that are devoid of extra genes. Furthermore, we provide evidence that these strategies are simple, reproducible, and do not disrupt the intended cell-type specific transgene expression patterns for several distinct BAC clones. These strategies may be widely implemented for improved BAC transgenesis across diverse disciplines.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipBrain and Behavior Research Foundation (Young Investigator Award)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Health (U.S.). Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (F32-MH084460)en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundationen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnbeh.2014.00111en_US
dc.rightsArticle is made available in accordance with the publisher's policy and may be subject to US copyright law. Please refer to the publisher's site for terms of use.en_US
dc.sourceFrontiers Research Foundationen_US
dc.titleRecombineering strategies for developing next generation BAC transgenic tools for optogenetics and beyonden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationTing, Jonathan T., and Guoping Feng. “Recombineering Strategies for Developing Next Generation BAC Transgenic Tools for Optogenetics and Beyond.” Front. Behav. Neurosci. 8 (April 3, 2014).en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMcGovern Institute for Brain Research at MITen_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorTing, Jonathan Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorFeng, Guopingen_US
dc.relation.journalFrontiers in Behavioral Neuroscienceen_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dspace.orderedauthorsTing, Jonathan T.; Feng, Guopingen_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-8021-277X
mit.licensePUBLISHER_POLICYen_US


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