Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBasak, Kakali
dc.contributor.authorHetu, Seth N.
dc.contributor.authorAzevedo, Carlos Lima
dc.contributor.authorLoganathan, Harish
dc.contributor.authorToledo, Tomer
dc.contributor.authorXu, Runmin
dc.contributor.authorXu, Yan
dc.contributor.authorPeh, Li-Shiuan
dc.contributor.authorBen-Akiva, Moshe E.
dc.contributor.authorLi, Zhemin
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-26T17:38:09Z
dc.date.available2014-08-26T17:38:09Z
dc.date.issued2013-10
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-4799-2914-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/89073
dc.description.abstractHuman reaction time has a substantial effect on modeling of human behavior at a microscopic level. Drivers and pedestrian do not react to an event instantaneously; rather, they take time to perceive the event, process the information, decide on a response and finally enact their decision. All these processes introduce delay. As human movement is simulated at increasingly fine-grained resolutions, it becomes critical to consider the delay due to reaction time if one is to achieve accurate results. Most existing simulators over-simplify the reaction time implementation to reduce computational overhead and memory requirements. In this paper, we detail the framework which we are developing within the SimMobility Short Term Simulator (a microscopic traffic simulator), which is capable of explicitly modeling reaction time for each person in a detailed, flexible manner. This framework will enable modelers to set realistic reaction time values, relying on the simulator to handle implementation and optimization considerations. Following this, we report our findings demonstrating the impact of reaction time on traffic dynamics within several simulation scenarios. The findings indicate that in the incorporation of reaction time within microscopic simulations improves the traffic dynamics that produces more realistic traffic condition.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSingapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technologyen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)en_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ITSC.2013.6728249en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alikeen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en_US
dc.sourceMIT web domainen_US
dc.titleModeling reaction time within a traffic simulation modelen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationBasak, Kakali, Seth N. Hetu, Zhemin Li, Carlos Lima Azevedo, Harish Loganathan, Tomer Toledo, Runmin Xu, Yan Xu, Li-Shiuan Peh, and Moshe Ben-Akiva. “Modeling Reaction Time Within a Traffic Simulation Model.” 16th International IEEE Conference on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITSC 2013) (October 2013).en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorXu, Runminen_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorPeh, Li-Shiuanen_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorBen-Akiva, Moshe E.en_US
dc.relation.journalProceedings of the 16th International IEEE Conference on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITSC 2013)en_US
dc.eprint.versionAuthor's final manuscripten_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dspace.orderedauthorsBasak, Kakali; Hetu, Seth N.; Li, Zhemin; Azevedo, Carlos Lima; Loganathan, Harish; Toledo, Tomer; Xu, Runmin; Xu, Yan; Peh, Li-Shiuan; Ben-Akiva, Mosheen_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-9010-6519
mit.licenseOPEN_ACCESS_POLICYen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record