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dc.contributor.authorBrunet, Nicolas M.
dc.contributor.authorBosman, Conrado A.
dc.contributor.authorVinck, Martin
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Mark
dc.contributor.authorOostenveld, Robert
dc.contributor.authorDesimone, Robert
dc.contributor.authorDe Weerd, Peter
dc.contributor.authorFries, Pascal
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-05T19:34:59Z
dc.date.available2014-11-05T19:34:59Z
dc.date.issued2014-02
dc.date.submitted2013-05
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424
dc.identifier.issn1091-6490
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/91467
dc.description.abstractWhen a sensory stimulus repeats, neuronal firing rate and functional MRI blood oxygen level-dependent responses typically decline, yet perception and behavioral performance either stay constant or improve. An additional aspect of neuronal activity is neuronal synchronization, which can enhance the impact of neurons onto their postsynaptic targets independent of neuronal firing rates. We show that stimulus repetition leads to profound changes of neuronal gamma-band (∼40–90 Hz) synchronization. Electrocorticographic recordings in two awake macaque monkeys demonstrated that repeated presentations of a visual grating stimulus resulted in a steady increase of visually induced gamma-band activity in area V1, gamma-band synchronization between areas V1 and V4, and gamma-band activity in area V4. Microelectrode recordings in area V4 of two additional monkeys under the same stimulation conditions allowed a direct comparison of firing rates and gamma-band synchronization strengths for multiunit activity (MUA), as well as for isolated single units, sorted into putative pyramidal cells and putative interneurons. MUA and putative interneurons showed repetition-related decreases in firing rate, yet increases in gamma-band synchronization. Putative pyramidal cells showed no repetition-related firing rate change, but a decrease in gamma-band synchronization for weakly stimulus-driven units and constant gamma-band synchronization for strongly driven units. We propose that the repetition-related changes in gamma-band synchronization maintain the interareal stimulus signaling and sharpen the stimulus representation by gamma-synchronized pyramidal cell spikes.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipHuman Frontier Science Program (Strasbourg, France) (Organization Grant RGP0070/2003)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipVolkswagen Foundation (Grant I/79876)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipEuropean Science Foundation (European Young Investigator Award Program)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipEuropean Union (HEALTH-F2-2008-200728 Grant)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipState Offensive for Development of Scientific and Economic Excellence (program grant “Neuronale Koordination Forschungsschwerpunkt Frankfurt”)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNetherlands. Ministry of Economic Affairs (Smart Mix Programme)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNetherlands. Ministry of Education, Culture, and Science (BrainGain)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNetherlands Organization for Scientific Research (Grant 452-03-344)en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciences (U.S.)en_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1309714111en_US
dc.rightsArticle is made available in accordance with the publisher's policy and may be subject to US copyright law. Please refer to the publisher's site for terms of use.en_US
dc.sourcePNASen_US
dc.titleStimulus repetition modulates gamma-band synchronization in primate visual cortexen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationBrunet, N. M., C. A. Bosman, M. Vinck, M. Roberts, R. Oostenveld, R. Desimone, P. De Weerd, and P. Fries. “Stimulus Repetition Modulates Gamma-Band Synchronization in Primate Visual Cortex.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 111, no. 9 (February 19, 2014): 3626–3631.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMcGovern Institute for Brain Research at MITen_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorDesimone, Roberten_US
dc.relation.journalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciencesen_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dspace.orderedauthorsBrunet, Nicolas M.; Bosman, Conrado A.; Vinck, Martin; Roberts, Mark; Oostenveld, Robert; Desimone, Robert; De Weerd, Peter; Fries, Pascalen_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-5938-4227
mit.licensePUBLISHER_POLICYen_US


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