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dc.contributor.authorShahin, Ilan
dc.contributor.authorSohal, Raman
dc.contributor.authorGinther, John
dc.contributor.authorHayden, Leigh
dc.contributor.authorMossman, Kathryn
dc.contributor.authorParikh, Himanshu
dc.contributor.authorMcGahan, Anita
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Will
dc.contributor.authorBhattacharyya, Onil
dc.contributor.authorMacDonald, John Angus
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-24T15:44:12Z
dc.date.available2014-12-24T15:44:12Z
dc.date.issued2014-11
dc.date.submitted2013-07
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/92495
dc.description.abstractBackground Scaling up innovative healthcare programs offers a means to improve access, quality, and health equity across multiple health areas. Despite large numbers of promising projects, little is known about successful efforts to scale up. This study examines trans-national scale, whereby a program operates in two or more countries. Trans-national scale is a distinct measure that reflects opportunities to replicate healthcare programs in multiple countries, thereby providing services to broader populations. Methods Based on the Center for Health Market Innovations (CHMI) database of nearly 1200 health programs, the study contrasts 116 programs that have achieved trans-national scale with 1,068 single-country programs. Data was collected on the programs' health focus, service activity, legal status, and funding sources, as well as the programs' locations (rural v. urban emphasis), and founding year; differences are reported with statistical significance. Findings This analysis examines 116 programs that have achieved trans-national scale (TNS) across multiple disease areas and activity types. Compared to 1,068 single-country programs, we find that trans-nationally scaled programs are more donor-reliant; more likely to focus on targeted health needs such as HIV/AIDS, TB, malaria, or family planning rather than provide more comprehensive general care; and more likely to engage in activities that support healthcare services rather than provide direct clinical care. Conclusion This work, based on a large data set of health programs, reports on trans-national scale with comparison to single-country programs. The work is a step towards understanding when programs are able to replicate their services as they attempt to expand health services for the poor across countries and health areas. A subset of these programs should be the subject of case studies to understand factors that affect the scaling process, particularly seeking to identify mechanisms that lead to improved health outcomes.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0110465en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attributionen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.sourcePublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.titleTrans-National Scale-Up of Services in Global Healthen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationShahin, Ilan, Raman Sohal, John Ginther, Leigh Hayden, John A. MacDonald, Kathryn Mossman, Himanshu Parikh, Anita McGahan, Will Mitchell, and Onil Bhattacharyya. “Trans-National Scale-Up of Services in Global Health.” Edited by Jeremy D. Goldhaber-Fiebert. PLoS ONE 9, no. 11 (November 6, 2014): e110465.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Media Laboratoryen_US
dc.contributor.departmentSloan School of Managementen_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorMacDonald, John Angusen_US
dc.relation.journalPLoS ONEen_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dspace.orderedauthorsShahin, Ilan; Sohal, Raman; Ginther, John; Hayden, Leigh; MacDonald, John A.; Mossman, Kathryn; Parikh, Himanshu; McGahan, Anita; Mitchell, Will; Bhattacharyya, Onilen_US
mit.licensePUBLISHER_CCen_US


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