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dc.contributor.authorSidor, Michelle M.
dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Thomas J.
dc.contributor.authorWarden, Melissa R.
dc.contributor.authorDiesseroth, Karl
dc.contributor.authorMcClung, Colleen A.
dc.contributor.authorTye, Kay
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-19T16:30:33Z
dc.date.available2015-02-19T16:30:33Z
dc.date.issued2015-01
dc.identifier.issn1940-087X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/94634
dc.description.abstractThe ability to probe defined neural circuits in awake, freely-moving animals with cell-type specificity, spatial precision, and high temporal resolution has been a long sought tool for neuroscientists in the systems-level search for the neural circuitry governing complex behavioral states. Optogenetics is a cutting-edge tool that is revolutionizing the field of neuroscience and represents one of the first systematic approaches to enable causal testing regarding the relation between neural signaling events and behavior. By combining optical and genetic approaches, neural signaling can be bi-directionally controlled through expression of light-sensitive ion channels (opsins) in mammalian cells. The current protocol describes delivery of specific wavelengths of light to opsin-expressing cells in deep brain structures of awake, freely-moving rodents for neural circuit modulation. Theoretical principles of light transmission as an experimental consideration are discussed in the context of performing in vivo optogenetic stimulation. The protocol details the design and construction of both simple and complex laser configurations and describes tethering strategies to permit simultaneous stimulation of multiple animals for high-throughput behavioral testing.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Health (U.S.) (Grant MH082876)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Health (U.S.) (Grant DA023988)en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMyJoVE Corporationen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3791/51483en_US
dc.rightsArticle is made available in accordance with the publisher's policy and may be subject to US copyright law. Please refer to the publisher's site for terms of use.en_US
dc.sourceMyJoVE Corporationen_US
dc.titleIn vivo Optogenetic Stimulation of the Rodent Central Nervous Systemen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationSidor, Michelle M., Thomas J. Davidson, Kay M. Tye, Melissa R. Warden, Karl Diesseroth, and Colleen A. McClung. “In Vivo Optogenetic Stimulation of the Rodent Central Nervous System.” JoVE no. 95 (2015). © 2015 Journal of Visualized Experiments and Leica Microsystemsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPicower Institute for Learning and Memoryen_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorTye, Kayen_US
dc.relation.journalJournal of Visualized Experimentsen_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dspace.orderedauthorsSidor, Michelle M.; Davidson, Thomas J.; Tye, Kay M.; Warden, Melissa R.; Diesseroth, Karl; McClung, Colleen A.en_US
mit.licensePUBLISHER_POLICYen_US


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