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dc.contributor.authorGabrieli, John D. E.
dc.contributor.authorLadd, Sandra
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T15:07:27Z
dc.date.available2015-08-21T15:07:27Z
dc.date.issued2015-05
dc.date.submitted2015-01
dc.identifier.issn1664-1078
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/98184
dc.description.abstractThe mere exposure effect refers to an affective preference elicited by exposure to previously unfamiliar items. Although it is a well-established finding, its mechanism remains uncertain, with some positing that it reflects affective processes and others positing that it reflects perceptual or motor fluency with repeated items. Here we examined whether individual differences in trait and state anxiety, which have been associated with the experience of emotion, influence the mere exposure effect. Participants’ trait (Study 1) and state (Study 2) anxiety were characterized with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Greater trait and state anxiety correlated with greater negative affect and lesser positive affect. In both experiments, greater anxiety was associated with a reduced mere exposure effect. Measures of fluency (response times at study and test) were unrelated to the mere exposure effect. These findings support the role of affective processes in the mere exposure effect, and offer a new insight into the nature of anxiety such that anxiety is associated with a reduced experience of positive affect typically associated with familiarity.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundationen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00701en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attributionen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.sourceFrontiers Research Foundationen_US
dc.titleTrait and state anxiety reduce the mere exposure effecten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationLadd, Sandra L., and John D. E. Gabrieli. “Trait and State Anxiety Reduce the Mere Exposure Effect.” Front. Psychol. 6 (May 28, 2015).en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMcGovern Institute for Brain Research at MITen_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorLadd, Sandraen_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorGabrieli, John D. E.en_US
dc.relation.journalFrontiers in Psychologyen_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dspace.orderedauthorsLadd, Sandra L.; Gabrieli, John D. E.en_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-1158-5692
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-1221-3014
mit.licensePUBLISHER_CCen_US


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