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dc.contributor.authorTan, BoonFei
dc.contributor.authorNg, Charmaine
dc.contributor.authorNshimyimana, Jean Pierre
dc.contributor.authorLoh, Lay Leng
dc.contributor.authorGin, Karina Y.-H.
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Janelle Renee
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-03T18:06:04Z
dc.date.available2015-11-03T18:06:04Z
dc.date.issued2015-09
dc.date.submitted2015-07
dc.identifier.issn1664-302X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/99686
dc.description.abstractWater quality is an emergent property of a complex system comprised of interacting microbial populations and introduced microbial and chemical contaminants. Studies leveraging next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are providing new insights into the ecology of microbially mediated processes that influence fresh water quality such as algal blooms, contaminant biodegradation, and pathogen dissemination. In addition, sequencing methods targeting small subunit (SSU) rRNA hypervariable regions have allowed identification of signature microbial species that serve as bioindicators for sewage contamination in these environments. Beyond amplicon sequencing, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses of microbial communities in fresh water environments reveal the genetic capabilities and interplay of waterborne microorganisms, shedding light on the mechanisms for production and biodegradation of toxins and other contaminants. This review discusses the challenges and benefits of applying NGS-based methods to water quality research and assessment. We will consider the suitability and biases inherent in the application of NGS as a screening tool for assessment of biological risks and discuss the potential and limitations for direct quantitative interpretation of NGS data. Secondly, we will examine case studies from recent literature where NGS based methods have been applied to topics in water quality assessment, including development of bioindicators for sewage pollution and microbial source tracking, characterizing the distribution of toxin and antibiotic resistance genes in water samples, and investigating mechanisms of biodegradation of harmful pollutants that threaten water quality. Finally, we provide a short review of emerging NGS platforms and their potential applications to the next generation of water quality assessment tools.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSingapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology. Center for Environmental Sensing and Modelingen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundationen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2015.01027en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attributionen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.sourceFrontiers Research Foundationen_US
dc.titleNext-generation sequencing (NGS) for assessment of microbial water quality: current progress, challenges, and future opportunitiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationTan, BoonFei, Charmaine Ng, Jean Pierre Nshimyimana, Lay Leng Loh, Karina Y.-H. Gin, and Janelle R. Thompson. “Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) for Assessment of Microbial Water Quality: Current Progress, Challenges, and Future Opportunities.” Frontiers in Microbiology 6 (September 25, 2015).en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorThompson, Janelle Reneeen_US
dc.relation.journalFrontiers in Microbiologyen_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dspace.orderedauthorsTan, BoonFei; Ng, Charmaine; Nshimyimana, Jean Pierre; Loh, Lay Leng; Gin, Karina Y.-H.; Thompson, Janelle R.en_US
mit.licensePUBLISHER_CCen_US


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