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dc.contributor.authorSiegel, Mikey
dc.contributor.authorBreazeal, Cynthia Lynn
dc.contributor.authorNorton, Michael I.
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-07T20:16:30Z
dc.date.available2011-03-07T20:16:30Z
dc.date.issued2009-10
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-4244-3803-7
dc.identifier.otherINSPEC Accession Number: 11009732
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/61618
dc.description.abstractPersuasive Robotics is the study of persuasion as it applies to human-robot interaction (HRI). Persuasion can be generally defined as an attempt to change another’s beliefs or behavior. The act of influencing others is fundamental to nearly every type of social interaction. Any agent desiring to seamlessly operate in a social manner will need to incorporate this type of core human behavior. As in human interaction, myriad aspects of a humanoid robot’s appearance and behavior can significantly alter its persuasiveness – this work will focus on one particular factor: gender. In the current study, run at the Museum of Science in Boston, subjects interacted with a humanoid robot whose gender was varied. After a short interaction and persuasive appeal, subjects responded to a donation request made by the robot, and subsequently completed a post-study questionnaire. Findings showed that men were more likely to donate money to the female robot, while women showed little preference. Subjects also tended to rate the robot of the opposite sex as more credible, trustworthy, and engaging. In the case of trust and engagement the effect was much stronger between male subjects and the female robot. These results demonstrate the importance of considering robot and human gender in the design of HRI.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Media Laboratoryen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers / Robotics Society of Japanen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/IROS.2009.5354116en_US
dc.rightsArticle is made available in accordance with the publisher's policy and may be subject to US copyright law. Please refer to the publisher's site for terms of use.en_US
dc.sourceIEEEen_US
dc.titlePersuasive Robotics: the influence of robot gender on human behavioren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationSiegel, M., C. Breazeal, and M.I. Norton. “Persuasive Robotics: The influence of robot gender on human behavior.” Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2009. IROS 2009. IEEE/RSJ International Conference on. 2009. 2563-2568. © 2009, IEEEen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Personal Robots Groupen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Media Laboratoryen_US
dc.contributor.departmentProgram in Media Arts and Sciences (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)en_US
dc.contributor.approverBreazeal, Cynthia Lynn
dc.contributor.mitauthorSiegel, Mikey
dc.contributor.mitauthorBreazeal, Cynthia Lynn
dc.relation.journalIEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS)en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/ConferencePaperen_US
dspace.orderedauthorsSiegel, Mikey; Breazeal, Cynthia; Norton, Michael I.en
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-0587-2065
mit.licensePUBLISHER_POLICYen_US


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